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Buyer’s Pick: Feline Munck of TV2 Denmark

When asked to choose a significant acquisition, TV2's Feline Munck didn't hesitate for a moment - not surprising, considering that, since she acquired the Danish rights at mipcom, Au nom de l'honneur has gone on to critical success and an international...
February 1, 1998

When asked to choose a significant acquisition, TV2′s Feline Munck didn’t hesitate for a moment – not surprising, considering that, since she acquired the Danish rights at mipcom, Au nom de l’honneur has gone on to critical success and an international award.

From writer/director Dominique Torrès for France 2, the 52-minute film is based on the true story of a Turkish-born 15-year-old French girl who was murdered in Paris in 1993 by a member of her family. Her killer, who objected to what he thought was a rejection of her Turkish traditions for a more European lifestyle, is now in a French jail for murder.

The film won the 1997 Prix Niki in Thessaloniki, Greece. The annual festival celebrates film which improves the portrayal of women on television, and focuses attention on women’s efforts to play an equal and active part in society.

Munck paid us$3,500 for the Danish rights to Au nom de l’honneur, which is just one of 30-40 programs she buys every year. Her preference runs mostly to 30- or 60-minute one-offs, but she will also consider series with up to four or six parts. Feature-length docs have a shot if, as she suggests, they’re ‘something special.’

Munck is especially pleased about her choice, not only because it is now winning awards, but because it reflects the social landscape in Denmark: an important factor in the docs she selects. ‘It is a very important problem – a problem which is very relevant in Denmark, because we also have a lot of Turkish immigrants here.’ She usually fills the weekly 10:20 p.m. slot, which Au nom played in, with what she calls ‘strong, primetime docs’ of all genres, especially those infused with a powerful human interest story, or which are socially challenging. Her central concern is that the film have a ‘strong, human story.’

Not all her picks are as wrenching as Torrès’ film. This year, she also acquired 13 half-hours of Lonely Planet from u.k.-based Pilot Films to be shown in the Sunday afternoon slot for which she also buys.

About The Author
Meagan Kashty is an associate editor of realscreen, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Meagan is an award-winning business journalist. Prior to joining the realscreen team, Meagan was online editor of Canadian Grocer, named Magazine of the Year at the 2015 Canadian Business Media Awards. She can be reached at mkashty@brunico.com, and you can follow her on Twitter @MegKashty

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