Docs

Special Report for Hot Docs! 98: Joining the Canadian Club

As one of the largest producers of documentaries in the world, Canada has both a financial environment...
March 1, 1998

As one of the largest producers of documentaries in the world, Canada has both a financial environment

conducive to coproduction and a high tolerance for edgy, often controversial subject matter. In honor of Hot Docs! ’98, the Canadian International Documentary Festival Awards and Conference, Gerry Flahive offers a sampling of the Great North’s hottest new docmakers, and Susan Karnay decodes how to capitalize on Canadian financing incentives

Hooking into Hot Docs

The mandate of Hot Docs (March 18-22 in Toronto) was ‘always to celebrate the art and business of documentary film,’ as well as to showcase Canadian doc talent, says executive director Deborah Nightingale. Hot Docs! ’98 will screen 61 films in competition, boiled down from 408 entries, and eight in a curated film series from Germany.

In addition to the festival, the event includes a pitch session (moderated by Pat Ferns of the Banff Television Festival, Discovery U.K.’s Chris Haws, and Jan Rofekamp of Films Transit), micro-meetings wherein producers are matched with commissioners, and ‘Producers Breakfasts’ intended to bring together filmmakers for partnership discussions.

A spotlight on arte is the centerpiece of the industry conference, with head of documentaries, Hans Eisenhauer, and commissioning editor, Christoph Jorg, on hand. The multi-national European broadcaster was invited because of its openness to coproduction with Canadian producers, according to Nightingale.

Also scheduled to be in attendance are Alan Haley and Robin Gutch of C4, Nick Fraser from the bbc, a&e’s Amy Briamonte, Tapestry’s Nancy Walzog and reps from National Geographic and Turner.

Over Hot Docs’ four-year lifespan, the event has become increasingly international. Says Nightingale: ‘We’ve established ourselves as a bridge between Europe and North America.’

International hot docs! contenders

Best International Doc under 60 minutes

In My Father’s House

D: Fatima Jebli Ouazzani

P: Marty De Jong

Mabo: Life of an Island Man

D: Trevor Graham

P: Denise Haslem/

Phillip Nelson

Memories D’Immigres

(In Three Parts)

D: Yamina Benguinui

P: Philippe Dupuis-Mendel

Wasteland (Auf Der Kippe)

D: Andre Schwartz

P: Stephan Schuber/

Ralph Schwingel

Best International

Doc under 60 minutes

The Disappearance of Tisoeur: Haiti After Duvaller

D/P: Harriet Hirshorn

The Diving Bell and

The Butterfly

D/P: Jean-Jacques Beineix

I Don’t Know Where, or

When, or How…

D/P: Zelimir Gvardiol

An Imaginary Life

D/P: Don Featherstone

Out For Love… Be Back Shortly

D/P: Dan Katzir

Best Doc Produced by a Broadcaster Outside Canada

Desert Storm’s Deadly Weapon

A&E Television Networks

The Execution Machine: Texas Death Row

HBO

The Fifties: Fear and The Dream

The History Channel

Heart of a Child

HBO

The Search For Mother Russia’s Children

HBO

In this report:

-The Next Generation: Canadian Docmakers on the rise

-Finding the Canadian Nest Egg: Government Financing via copro and co-venture

About The Author
Selina Chignall joins the realscreen team as a staff writer. Prior to working with rs, she covered lobbying activity at Hill Times Publishing. She also spent a year covering the Hill as a journalist with iPolitics. Her beat focused on youth, education, democratic reform, innovation and infrastructure. She holds a Master of Arts in Journalism from Western University and a Honours Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto.

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