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Odds & Sods

Shutter Bug...
September 1, 2000

Shutter Bug

While shooting the Disney film Whispers, cinematographer/filmmaker Dereck Joubert of Wildlife Films Botswana spent six weeks, working day and night, trying to capture lions attacking elephants near a watering hole. Despite the fact that the lions repeatedly attacked from behind the herd, Joubert managed to catch approximately two minutes of the hunt. Unfortunately, when the film was sent to the lab, it reported back every shot was ruined because of a camera fault.

It’s a Dirty Job…

Assured by a resident farmer that the large pig resting in a wallow of mud had no intention of moving, nhnz director/researcher Quinn Berentson proceeded to set up a shot for Twisted Tales – The Pig. Just when the crew was ready to begin shooting, the pig stood up, turned to face them and shook itself like a dog, covering both crew and camera in thick, smelly mud.

A glowing report

Several rolls of film couriered from Alaska to the Henninger Capitol post-production facility in Washington, D.C. are suspected to have come into contact with high levels of radiation at an airport overnight storage facility. Damage to the film was so extensive it could not be repaired. A large portion of the lost footage documented the closing of a fish plant and could not be re-shot. Nobody at Henninger had ever seen radiation damage to such an extent.

Looting on Location

While filming Island Magic in Jakarta, NHNZ producer Rod Morris and cameraman Malcolm Ludgate were forced to leave six weeks of footage in a besieged hotel after riots erupted during student protests against President Suharto’s rule. After escaping, the pair returned a few weeks later to discover the film had survived the violence undamaged.

Lights, Camera, Lava

Producer Richard Matthews’ 3 x 50-minute series Wild Indonesia, being filmed for the BBC’s Natural World slot by Bristol-based Zebra Film Productions, almost came to an abrupt end when the volcano Krakatau suddenly erupted. Krakatau, which gives no prior warning when it explodes, started erupting early last year. A volcanologist had assured Matthews it was safe to visit the day he was there, but as the camera crew was walking to the base of the volcano and Matthews was approaching the beach in a boat, they heard a loud bang and rocks half the size of cars showered down around them. Miraculously, nobody was hit.

About The Author
Meagan Kashty is an associate editor of realscreen, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Meagan is an award-winning business journalist. Prior to joining the realscreen team, Meagan was online editor of Canadian Grocer, named Magazine of the Year at the 2015 Canadian Business Media Awards. She can be reached at mkashty@brunico.com, and you can follow her on Twitter @MegKashty

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