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Hello, Blue Planet; goodbye, Louise Rosen Ltd.

When Blue Planet Entertainment approached Louise Rosen at MIPCOM in April, it had an executive position in mind. Says Rosen, 'They described their goals - what they intended to do with a North American office, and how they would eventually expand with other international offices - and it sounded like a very exciting opportunity.' Rosen has since decided to shelve six-year-old Louise Rosen Ltd. in favor of the newly acquired title of VP and GM of the new Blue Planet Entertainment subsidiary in Boston.
July 1, 2001

When Blue Planet Entertainment approached Louise Rosen at MIPCOM in April, it had an executive position in mind. Says Rosen, ‘They described their goals – what they intended to do with a North American office, and how they would eventually expand with other international offices – and it sounded like a very exciting opportunity.’ Rosen has since decided to shelve six-year-old Louise Rosen Ltd. in favor of the newly acquired title of VP and GM of the new Blue Planet Entertainment subsidiary in Boston.

Rosen will be bringing the bulk of her catalog with her. Says Rosen, ‘Of the projects and finished programs I represent as Louise Rosen Ltd., about six to eight, of around 10 or 12, will make the transition. The others will go back to their producers.’ After a few months, in which Rosen will wrap things up with those not making the transition, Rosen says, ‘I will be 100% dedicated to Blue Planet, with nothing on the side.’ Although the final word on projects going to Blue Planet has not yet been uttered, Rosen is sure of a few: Stealing the Fire (Friedman-Nadler Productions) and The Heywood Project (West City Films).

In her new role, Rosen will work with indies to develop projects, and set up presales and coproductions – what she’s been doing all along – but with one key difference. ‘I’ll be handling the development of our in-house projects,’ says Rosen. ‘In all these years of working with independents, I’ve had a constant idea file. I will read about something, or hear about something, and think, ‘Damn, that would make a great program.’ I always look for a producer to do a laying on of hands, but there has not always been an opportunity to send my little babies out and have them adopted by others. In this new setup, I’ll be able to give full flight to my fancy.’

About The Author
Barry Walsh is editor and content director for realscreen, and has served as editor of the publication since 2009. With a career in entertainment media that spans two decades, prior to realscreen, he held the associate editor post for now defunct sister publication Boards, which focused on the advertising and commercial production industries. Before Boards, he served as editor of Canadian Music Network, a weekly music industry trade, and as music editor for HMV.com. As content director, he also oversees the development of content for the brand's market-leading events, the Realscreen Summit and Realscreen West, as well as new content initiatives.

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