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Granada re-brands libraries

Beginning in January, Granada Clip Sales will take the first step towards capitalizing on its archives by streamlining and re-branding its libraries. 'The individual library names will be secondary to the main brand, Granada ___ [the new name has not yet been disclosed],' explains Mark Leaver, head of sales and marketing of clip sales for the u.k. company. He says Granada is building a central database (text-based in the short-term, image-based over the long haul) to connect the regional outlets - including Granada Wild in Norwich and London Weekend Television - to allow customers the luxury of one-stop shopping. The Granada libraries will also have a central website, phone number and email address.
November 1, 2001

Beginning in January, Granada Clip Sales will take the first step towards capitalizing on its archives by streamlining and re-branding its libraries. ‘The individual library names will be secondary to the main brand, Granada ___ [the new name has not yet been disclosed],’ explains Mark Leaver, head of sales and marketing of clip sales for the u.k. company. He says Granada is building a central database (text-based in the short-term, image-based over the long haul) to connect the regional outlets – including Granada Wild in Norwich and London Weekend Television – to allow customers the luxury of one-stop shopping. The Granada libraries will also have a central website, phone number and email address.

To date, Granada has been more reactive than proactive with clip sales, admits Leaver. But, that’s about to change. ‘I think there is a realization among the larger television companies that libraries are a resource they can exploit,’ he says. ‘It can be a lucrative source of revenue that has already paid for itself.’

Leaver insists Granada is not planning to scale back on staff: ‘The streamlining process is not one of cutting numbers. If anything, it will probably add numbers over the medium term.’ He concedes, however, that Granada will consider consolidating the libraries in some regions, such as London and Leeds.

The second step will be to expand beyond the broadcast market. Says Leaver, ‘[We've] never looked at the advertising or corporate markets, or all of the other markets that use footage… There’s a slightly different mindset that needs to be brought to the company.’ He estimates the full conversion of Granada’s libraries, including digitization, will take around three years. Right now, Granada is sitting on 90,000 hours of footage, and the library continues to grow. Leaver estimates an addition of 6,000 hours per year from Granada’s production arm alone.

About The Author
Daniele Alcinii is a news reporter at realscreen, the leading international publisher of non-fiction film and television industry news and content. He joins the rs team with journalism experience following a stint out west with Sun Media in Edmonton's Capital Region, and communications work in Melbourne, Australia and Toronto. You can follow him on Twitter at @danielealcinii.

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