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This month, RealScreen catches up with Mark Urman, head of distribution at New York-based ThinkFilm, to gauge the current non-fiction landscape. ThinkFilm will release Jonathan Demme's feature doc, The Agronomist, in the U.S. on April 16.
February 1, 2004

This month, RealScreen catches up with Mark Urman, head of distribution at New York-based ThinkFilm, to gauge the current non-fiction landscape. ThinkFilm will release Jonathan Demme’s feature doc, The Agronomist, in the U.S. on April 16.

Q: What non-fiction project that’s out there at the moment do you most wish you were attached to?

I’d be thrilled to be the theatrical distribributor of the Lars von Trier/Jorgen Leth movie The Five Obstructions, but, it was envisioned as a TV commodity. I saw it at the Toronto International Film Festival and it blew me away.

Q: Is there a particular subject matter in non-fiction films that is resonating with viewers right now?

There is an almost neo-60s, anti-corporate, anti-government, anti-authoritarian vibe emerging. I’m seeing it in The Corporation, Ron Mann’s Go Further, The Yes Men by Chris Smith and Errol Morris’ The Fog of War. I’m also seeing it in The Agronomist, which is a film in defence of freedom of the press, freedom of expression and a celebration of flat-out, unadulterated classic heroism.

About The Author
Barry Walsh is editor and content director for realscreen, and has served as editor of the publication since 2009. With a career in entertainment media that spans two decades, prior to realscreen, he held the associate editor post for now defunct sister publication Boards, which focused on the advertising and commercial production industries. Before Boards, he served as editor of Canadian Music Network, a weekly music industry trade, and as music editor for HMV.com. As content director, he also oversees the development of content for the brand's market-leading events, the Realscreen Summit and Realscreen West, as well as new content initiatives.

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