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Tech News; Kodak unspools new film stock

Even in the digital era, many doc-makers still shoot on film. It is with that niche in mind that Rochester, u.s.-based Kodak has released a new family of stock, the Vision2 Expression 500T color negative film. The newest 500-speed film developed
February 1, 2004

Even in the digital era, many doc-makers still shoot on film. It is with that niche in mind that Rochester, U.S.-based Kodak has released a new family of stock, the Vision2 Expression 500T color negative film. The newest 500-speed film developed
by Kodak’s Entertainment Imaging Division carries the designation 5229 (35 mm) and 7229 (16 mm), and features an emulsion that offers less grainy, more natural-looking images, especially at lower color and contrast ranges. It is the follow up to the more general-purpose stock – the 5218/7218 – with which Kodak launched Vision2 last winter. Cold Case, the CBS cop drama executive produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, is being shot on the 5218 grade of Vision2′s 35 mm stock.

Although Kodak was unable to provide a price to RealScreen, one Toronto, Canada film supplier was listing the 5218 (35 mm) at approximately US$258 per 400-foot roll, and the 7218 (16 mm) at roughly $148.50.

The greater flexibility of the Vision2 line offers dops more realistic color options, the company claims. Even in poorly lit scenes the 5229/7229 rushes feature sharper and clearer color, thanks to the emulsions enhanced sensitivity.

Kodak also bills Vision2 as being more efficient in post-production, saying its more nimble color renditions stand up well through the telecine process. There is less bleeding of associated tints and shades when the image is lifted off the celluloid, which saves time when correcting for telecine-related distortion.

The company plans to further expand the stock family later
in the year. MS

About The Author
Barry Walsh is editor and content director for realscreen, and has served as editor of the publication since 2009. With a career in entertainment media that spans two decades, prior to realscreen, he held the associate editor post for now defunct sister publication Boards, which focused on the advertising and commercial production industries. Before Boards, he served as editor of Canadian Music Network, a weekly music industry trade, and as music editor for HMV.com. As content director, he also oversees the development of content for the brand's market-leading events, the Realscreen Summit and Realscreen West, as well as new content initiatives.

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