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A goldfish of a tale

Stories of children flushing their goldfish down the toilet to set them free in the sea à la Disney's Finding Nemo may seem a little far-fetched, but everybody's favorite pet fish is catching up to ocean breeds like the tuna in terms of evolutionary prowess.
March 1, 2004

Stories of children flushing their goldfish down the toilet to set them free in the sea à la Disney’s Finding Nemo may seem a little far-fetched, but everybody’s favorite pet fish is catching up to ocean breeds like the tuna in terms of evolutionary prowess.

The Apex of Evolution (w/t), a one-hour coproduction by Paddington, Australia-based Gulliver Media and China Central Television, will examine the history and fast-paced development of the goldfish – the most genetically modified fish species – and compare this pet to what was thought to be its more highly evolved, sea-faring cousin, the tuna. First domesticated in China during the Tang dynasty, the goldfish has undergone so many genetic makeovers – from color changes to shape-shifting – it should be the Queer Eye boys’ mascot. The US$250,000 doc, which wraps in February 2005, will feature locations in and around China, as well as underwater filming of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

Gulliver is also tackle-ing another fishy copro with CCTV, tentatively titled Dragonfish, which wraps February 2005. This one-hour examines the brightly colored freshwater fish that are bred in large ponds in China and Singapore, and can grow to a meter in length. You wouldn’t want to flush this one down the toilet – some dragonfish can fetch up to $50,000. KV

About The Author
Daniele Alcinii is a news reporter at realscreen, the leading international publisher of non-fiction film and television industry news and content. He joins the rs team with journalism experience following a stint out west with Sun Media in Edmonton's Capital Region, and communications work in Melbourne, Australia and Toronto. You can follow him on Twitter at @danielealcinii.

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