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Reality TV: Remaking Television Culture

The craze for reality didn't just happen, it evolved. This anthology, published by NYU Press on April 1, traces the trend and explores its impact. It also looks at why the genre has engaged society, and how it contributes to cultural politics. Hopefully, it will enlighten the debate about issues of surveillance, taste and whether or not reality is here to stay. KB
March 1, 2004

The craze for reality didn’t just happen, it evolved. This anthology, published by NYU Press on April 1, traces the trend and explores its impact. It also looks at why the genre has engaged society, and how it contributes to cultural politics. Hopefully, it will enlighten the debate about issues of surveillance, taste and whether or not reality is here to stay. KB

About The Author
Selina Chignall joins the realscreen team as a staff writer. Prior to working with rs, she covered lobbying activity at Hill Times Publishing. She also spent a year covering the Hill as a journalist with iPolitics. Her beat focused on youth, education, democratic reform, innovation and infrastructure. She holds a Master of Arts in Journalism from Western University and a Honours Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto.

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