News

The Whole Package

Be the Creature, a family series airing in the US on National Geographic Channel starring Chris and Martin Kratt, is Decode Entertainment's first foray beyond its kids TV base into factual. And the Toronto-based prodco is navigating non-fiction with a fully fleshed-out brand plan. This time around, the brothers live as wild animals, surviving in remote environments with bare bones gear. Beyond the tube, their animal adventures invite interactivity via websites, interactive TV and an online multi-player game.
May 1, 2004

Be the Creature, a family series airing in the US on National Geographic Channel starring Chris and Martin Kratt, is Decode Entertainment’s first foray beyond its kids TV base into factual. And the Toronto-based prodco is navigating non-fiction with a fully fleshed-out brand plan. This time around, the brothers live as wild animals, surviving in remote environments with bare bones gear. Beyond the tube, their animal adventures invite interactivity via websites, interactive TV and an online multi-player game.

Dan Fill, VP Interactive, says web licenses (equivalent to the license fee of one episode) are a successful model, and more interest in customized content is anticipated from Europe. The first minisite, licensed to series coproducer Nat Geo, features field notes and a guide to the exotic creatures encountered on the show.

For the itv component – which incorporates trivia and images – Decode hooked up with Canada’s Vidéotron and Bell ExpressVu, and tapped into funds from the Bell New Media Fund, Telefilm, Vidéotron Fund, Telus eLearning Fund and Nat Geo. Decode Interactive initially used BlueStreak middleware (deployed on Vidéotron), and is also working on a more widely compatible Open TV version, which it plans to license in the u.s. for season two. Fill says itv is challenging due to the number of different platforms in use, but says Open TV is more viable in Europe.

And to really let the audience Be the Creature, the action/strategy game launches in September. Decode is considering a few revenue options for the 3D game – a pay-to-play model, or a fee to purchase an installer disc. The game draws on educational themes, but has enough fun, fighting and gore for the 12 to 15 set. Players control animal characters and complete goals in an entirely CGI-generated world where the Kratts guide excursions.

The show itself is poised to roll out globally. Nat Geo Channels International has cable and satellite rights in 145 countries for the 13 x 1-hour series, and the worldwide launch starts with Europe in May; it’s also sold to Canadian pubcaster CBC. MM

About The Author
Daniele Alcinii is a news reporter at realscreen, the leading international publisher of non-fiction film and television industry news and content. He joins the rs team with journalism experience following a stint out west with Sun Media in Edmonton's Capital Region, and communications work in Melbourne, Australia and Toronto. You can follow him on Twitter at @danielealcinii.

Menu

Search