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Party on… The wining part of dining

When it comes to business dinners, ordering the right wine can be tricky. But etiquette expert Lew Bayer, partner at The Civility Group, says there are a few simple guidelines you can follow to make the process as smooth as a good bottle of rosé:
October 1, 2007

When it comes to business dinners, ordering the right wine can be tricky. But etiquette expert Lew Bayer, partner at The Civility Group, says there are a few simple guidelines you can follow to make the process as smooth as a good bottle of rosé:

• It’s rude to pretend you know more than you do about wine. If you’re uncomfortable ordering, tasting or pouring, ask your wait person to help you.

• Don’t order the most expensive bottle on the menu. Snobbery isn’t very becoming to anyone.

• If you are the designated taster, when the wine arrives, all you need do is check the bottle to confirm it’s what was ordered, check the poured wine for pieces of cork or floaters, smell the wine (even uneducated noses can sniff out spoiled grapes), then take a small sip for flavor. If it doesn’t taste immediately disagreeable, let the wait staff commence pouring and leave others to discuss its undertones of tobacco, cherries, wet dog and what have you.

• If you are pouring, serve your guests first, pour a half glass at a time, and try not to let the bottle touch the glass whilst doing so.

About The Author
Meagan Kashty is an associate editor of realscreen, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Meagan is an award-winning business journalist. Prior to joining the realscreen team, Meagan was online editor of Canadian Grocer, named Magazine of the Year at the 2015 Canadian Business Media Awards. She can be reached at mkashty@brunico.com, and you can follow her on Twitter @MegKashty

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