Screening Room

Screamers

The genocides in Bosnia, Rwanda and Darfur all put lie to the sound bite 'never again,' tossed around so sternly after the Holocaust of the Second World War. In fact, mass exterminations have become so commonplace we barely notice them now, especially when it's an ally committing the crime.
October 5, 2007


The genocides in Bosnia, Rwanda and Darfur all put lie to the sound bite ‘never again,’ tossed around so sternly after the Holocaust of the Second World War. In fact, mass exterminations have become so commonplace we barely notice them now, especially when it’s an ally committing the crime. And that’s not something new to our generation. Early last century, as the world was positioning for the First World War, hundreds of thousands – perhaps millions – of Armenians were killed in Turkey.

Screamers is the tale of that genocide given an unlikely voice: the band System of a Down, whose members are all grandchildren of genocide survivors. The film follows the band as they tour the world and work towards the acknowledgement of the crime, both in the US and internationally. (To this day, Turkey claims the entire thing is a historical lie.) It’s a tough battle, as the band and other advocates are fighting against political affiliations and the interests of international business. Few films combine the attractiveness of pop culture with the hideous disposition of parts of our history. Screamers is a film that will work with many broadcast genres, and can introduce a new generation to forgotten aspects of world history.

Partners: MG2 Productions with the BBC and the Raffy Manoukian Charity distributed through B Wooding Media

Wrapped: 2007

Length: 91 minutes

Rights available: Worldwide

About The Author
Managing editor with realscreen publication, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Darah is an award-winning journalist who has spent over two decades covering a wide range of issues from real estate and urban development to immigration, politics and human rights, primarily with The Vancouver Sun. Prior to joining realscreen, she was editor of Stream Daily, realscreen's sister publication covering the dynamic global digital video industry. She also served a stint as a war reporter in Afghanistan for television and print, and was a national business blogger with Yahoo Canada.

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