Screening Room

The Science of Babies

As new parents can attest, children develop so much in the first year of their life it's hard to keep up. From the moment they draw their initial breath - itself an incredibly complicated biological feat - to their first steps, it's a year of remarkable development.
October 5, 2007


As new parents can attest, children develop so much in the first year of their life it’s hard to keep up. From the moment they draw their initial breath – itself an incredibly complicated biological feat – to their first steps, it’s a year of remarkable development.

In The Science of Babies, Nat Geo explores the amazing biomechanical benchmarks achieved in the first 12 months of human life. Using CGI, fMRI and other tools, viewers can watch as a baby’s lungs draw breath for the first time, and can witness the heart grow exponentially in order to power this incredible developing creature. Perhaps even more fascinating is the manner in which the neurosynapses develop, creating the essence of what will become a new personality and intellect. This film explores the amazing mechanics behind the initial milestones in a human infant’s life, and even compares them to babies of other species.

Beyond simply being a beautiful film to watch, the technology that Nat Geo uses to help tell the tale is remarkable.

Partners: National Geographic Television distributed through National Geographic Television International
Aired: September 2007
Length: 52 minutes
Rights available: World, excluding the US

About The Author
Daniele Alcinii is a news reporter at realscreen, the leading international publisher of non-fiction film and television industry news and content. He joins the rs team with journalism experience following a stint out west with Sun Media in Edmonton's Capital Region, and communications work in Melbourne, Australia and Toronto. You can follow him on Twitter at @danielealcinii.

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