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Will the WGA strike help reality TV?

The suggestion is that if the WGA strike lasts as long as the one in 1988 - which lasted five months - broadcasters and viewers will be turning to reality TV. Maureen Parker, executive director of the Writers Guild of Canada, says that given American programs are typically produced very close to their air dates, original programming will run out soon if the strike continues. 'American broadcasters are quickly experiencing scheduling holes, and the challenge will be how they choose to fill those slots. A number of these (reality) shows do go non-union. Their primary attraction to broadcasters is that they're a fraction of the cost of dramatic production.'
December 1, 2007

The suggestion is that if the WGA strike lasts as long as the one in 1988 – which lasted five months – broadcasters and viewers will be turning to reality TV. Maureen Parker, executive director of the Writers Guild of Canada, says that given American programs are typically produced very close to their air dates, original programming will run out soon if the strike continues. ‘American broadcasters are quickly experiencing scheduling holes, and the challenge will be how they choose to fill those slots. A number of these (reality) shows do go non-union. Their primary attraction to broadcasters is that they’re a fraction of the cost of dramatic production.’

About The Author
Meagan Kashty is an associate editor of realscreen, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Meagan is an award-winning business journalist. Prior to joining the realscreen team, Meagan was online editor of Canadian Grocer, named Magazine of the Year at the 2015 Canadian Business Media Awards. She can be reached at mkashty@brunico.com, and you can follow her on Twitter @MegKashty

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