Screening Room

Mip TV Picks 2008: It’s Always Late for Freedom

Most adults are conflicted about the idea of incarcerated children. While society has decided that their actions require that they be confined, the mitigating circumstances seem all that much more apparent when it comes to kids - poverty, abuse, addiction, divided families - it all plays a part in a reality that sees kids locked up when they should be out playing with friends.
April 2, 2008


Most adults are conflicted about the idea of incarcerated children. While society has decided that their actions require that they be confined, the mitigating circumstances seem all that much more apparent when it comes to kids – poverty, abuse, addiction, divided families – it all plays a part in a reality that sees kids locked up when they should be out playing with friends.

To Western sensibilities, the issue of children in prison is even more conflicted when the jail in question is in the Middle East. In It’s Always Late For Freedom, the filmmaker takes viewers into the House of Correction in Tehran to delve into the lives and cases of three teenaged boys. It is a unique insight into Iranian society and the conditions facing youth in that country.

It’s a relief that this film is made by a filmmaker in Tehran; it relieves the subject of the inevitable politics it would have been weighed down with had a Western filmmaker attempted it. This is an honest look at the lives of teens in trouble, and is definitely worth a watch. Partners: Oskouei Film Production (Tehran), distributed by Sheherazad Media International
Wrapped: 2007
Length: 53 minutes
Rights available: All worldwide, excluding Croatia, Greece and the US

About The Author
Barry Walsh is editor and content director for realscreen, and has served as editor of the publication since 2009. With a career in entertainment media that spans two decades, prior to realscreen, he held the associate editor post for now defunct sister publication Boards, which focused on the advertising and commercial production industries. Before Boards, he served as editor of Canadian Music Network, a weekly music industry trade, and as music editor for HMV.com. As content director, he also oversees the development of content for the brand's market-leading events, the Realscreen Summit and Realscreen West, as well as new content initiatives.

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