Docs

MIPCOM Picks: Bploi wai dtaai: Leave Her To Die

It's sometimes difficult to reconcile the disparate experiences faced by people around the world. Consider the experience, for example, of a two-year-old baby girl left alone on a bamboo mat in a government orphanage in Northern Thailand. Infected with the aids virus, her medical chart reads: 'Bploi wai dtaai.' Leave her to die.
October 7, 2008


It’s sometimes difficult to reconcile the disparate experiences faced by people around the world. Consider the experience, for example, of a two-year-old baby girl left alone on a bamboo mat in a government orphanage in Northern Thailand. Infected with the aids virus, her medical chart reads: ‘Bploi wai dtaai.’ Leave her to die.
Leave Her to Die is a film that focuses on the issue of aids orphans in Thailand. Abandoned in government orphanages by their parents, these children are alone and helpless, save for the work of one extraordinary woman, Avis Rideout. Rideout is determined to save as many of these children as she can by simply giving them shelter, normal experience and love. If you’re not moved by this film, you might consider accounting. Partners: Think Positive Productions in association with Buck Productions (Toronto)
Wrapped: June 2008. To air on CBC and documentary in Canada beginning in October
Length: 49 minutes
Rights available: All worldwide, excluding Canada

About The Author
Senior staff writer Frederick Blichert comes to realscreen with a background as a journalist and freelance film critic. He has previously written for VICE, Paste Magazine, Senses of Cinema, Xtra, Canadian Cinematographer and elsewhere. He holds a Master of Arts in film studies from Carleton University and a Master of Journalism from the University of British Columbia.

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