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CBC appoints two to Science & Natural History Unit.

Michael Allder, executive producer the CBC's science and natural history series The Nature of Things has a lot to talk about. At the forefront, the appointment of two new senior producers, and the upcoming season.
October 23, 2008

Michael Allder, executive producer the CBC’s science and natural history series The Nature of Things has a lot to talk about. At the forefront, the appointment of two new senior producers, and the upcoming season.

Caroline Underwood will be the natural history senior producer, and will bring her extensive history as a documentary producer. Underwood has been working with The Nature of Things for 25 years and recently co-directed the Antarctic Mission series. ‘She has a really illustrious history when it comes to natural history films,’ says Allder. The new science and technology senior producer is F.M. Morrison. Morrison’s credits include executive producer of CBC’s Undercurrents and The Greatest Canadian. She has a particular interest in science medicine and environmental issues. ‘They’re two recent additions to our particular little tribe here,’ says Allder. The two new hires will work in all areas of production in the Science and Natural History Units.

Look for a whole slew of mini-series in their upcoming schedule, says Allder, which will be considered limited series specials. Hot on the heels of CBC’s successful Geologic Journey series will be a planned sequel w/t Geologic Journey 2. Among other series planned will be a four-part series called One Ocean and another four-parter The Adventurers, which is built around scientific expeditions, co-produced with 90th Parallel Film & Television. But even among all the series specials, Allder says there will still be the single subject hours for which CBC has a large number. One such example is a natural history film called Broken Tails Last Journey. ‘It’s about a very famous tiger in India. It was iconic and in lots of classic documentaries over the years but eventually it just disappeared and we’re trying to track and see what happened to it, so it’s this sort of detective story to see what happened to this particular tiger,’ says Allder. That is currently in production, co-produced with Crossing the Line Films.

As for the big picture for The Nature of Things, Allder says they’re working with particular broadcasters, like ARTE in France, and they also have a growing relationship with NHK in Japan and Discovery Science in the US.

About The Author
Daniele Alcinii is a news reporter at realscreen, the leading international publisher of non-fiction film and television industry news and content. He joins the rs team with journalism experience following a stint out west with Sun Media in Edmonton's Capital Region, and communications work in Melbourne, Australia and Toronto. You can follow him on Twitter at @danielealcinii.

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