Docs

The Day After Peace picking up steam

Filmmaker and peace activist Jeremy Gilley says he feels like he's 'over the moon,' about his recent successes surrounding his documentary The Day After Peace. The film follows Gilley on his journey to lobby the United Nations to recognize and declare an international day of peace, from the initial stages of getting a UN motion proposed, supported, and then passed.
March 12, 2009

Filmmaker and peace activist Jeremy Gilley says he feels like he’s ‘over the moon,’ about his recent successes surrounding his documentary The Day After Peace. The film follows Gilley on his journey to lobby the United Nations to recognize and declare an international day of peace, from the initial stages of getting a UN motion proposed, supported, and then passed.

‘[The film] was effectively me traveling the world, building a case for the day’s existence, and then trying to find a government to put the idea forward to the United Nations General Assembly, to find another government to co-sponsor the resolution, and then to try to get it voted upon,’ he said. ‘That process took four years. It was epic, and I did it with my camera.’

Now Gilley’s campaign for world peace through his Peace One Day organization is about to reach a new milestone, which he describes as ‘the institutionalization process’ of informing the world about Peace Day – officially recognized by the UN as September 21. His next film will record that process as The Day After Peace enjoys ever-wider distribution and is screened in high schools in the United States and United Kingdom beginning in late April 2009.

‘The (upcoming) film is really all about the institutionalization [of Peace Day],’ he said. ‘I’ve just been recently filming staff at a university with the leading figures [that are asking questions like] ‘At which point can you say something is institutionalized?’ and, ‘What does that mean?”

Already confident that Peace Day will be as recognized throughout the world as Remembrance Day, Gilley is himself amazed at the progress he has made with the help of corporations such as Coca-Cola, Ben & Jerry’s and Scholastic in bringing his film to American and British high schools as an educational tool. In spite of those accomplishments, he refuses to sit on his laurels and has plans to document every ensuing step of his mission to promote Peace Day.

‘[What I'm currently interested in] recording is the process of how we go about telling the whole world about this day,’ he said. ‘Then I think I’ll create a [film] at the end of that which will tell the whole story.’

About The Author
Selina Chignall joins the realscreen team as a staff writer. Prior to working with rs, she covered lobbying activity at Hill Times Publishing. She also spent a year covering the Hill as a journalist with iPolitics. Her beat focused on youth, education, democratic reform, innovation and infrastructure. She holds a Master of Arts in Journalism from Western University and a Honours Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto.

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