Docs

FOCAL Awards put focus on footage

At the beginning of this year's edition of the FOCAL International Awards, in London's Royal Lancaster Hotel, host Lord David Puttnam made an unusual plea: he promised a 'glittery table prize' for anyone who could come up with a deft phrase to replace the dreaded moniker 'footage industry.'
May 1, 2009

At the beginning of this year’s edition of the FOCAL International Awards, in London’s Royal Lancaster Hotel, host Lord David Puttnam made an unusual plea: he promised a ‘glittery table prize’ for anyone who could come up with a deft phrase to replace the dreaded moniker ‘footage industry.’ Identity crisis notwithstanding, the evening was a chance to revel in just how critical the archive industry is to producing top-notch factual programming.

The BBC was the big winner of the night, its in-house divisions taking four awards for films ranging from The Thirties in Colour to The Great British Sunday and Natural World: Clever Monkeys, which used 100% archive footage to create David Attenborough’s tour of the world of monkeys. The BBC also commissioned Mark Stewart Productions’ Graham Hill – Driven, which won an award for best use of sports footage for its portrait of racing driver Graham Hill.

Siskel Jacobs Productions’ 102 Minutes that Changed America took one of three awards for best use of footage in a factual production. It employed more than 100 sources of amateur and professional footage to tell the 9/11 story, without narration or commentary. Other winners in that category included BBC Bristol’s The Unseen Alistair Cooke and David Leaf Productions’ The Night James Brown Saved Boston.

An award for best use of footage in a feature production went to Hurricane Film’s Of Time and the City in which director Terence Davies uses 80% archive footage to create a love song and a eulogy to his birthplace, Liverpool.

In some cases the category finalists were vastly different types of film projects, such as the Training/Education Production award which pitted UK director Olly Lambert’s intimate portrait Ben: Diary of a Heroin Addict with the ultimately successful Mysteries in the Archives, INA’s 10-part series which looks at historical events and analyzes how the archive footage has been used.

Paul Gardner, head of archive at Darlow Smithson Productions, won the Jane Mercer Researcher of the Year award for his work on the critically-acclaimed Thriller in Manila.

About The Author
Selina Chignall joins the realscreen team as a staff writer. Prior to working with rs, she covered lobbying activity at Hill Times Publishing. She also spent a year covering the Hill as a journalist with iPolitics. Her beat focused on youth, education, democratic reform, innovation and infrastructure. She holds a Master of Arts in Journalism from Western University and a Honours Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto.

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