Docs

DGC, NFB strike new deal

Documentary and animation directors working through the NFB will benefit from a collective agreement for the first time, under a three-year contract signed Wednesday by the board and the Directors Guild of Canada.
May 7, 2009

Documentary and animation directors working through the NFB will benefit from a collective agreement for the first time, under a three-year contract signed Wednesday by the board and the Directors Guild of Canada.

The agreement, signed at a Toronto ceremony by DGC president Sturla Gunnarsson and National Film Board chair Tom Perlmutter, establishes terms and conditions for directors on all audio-visual productions at the board, and gives doc and animation helmers across the country the opportunity to join the DGC and take advantage of union protection.

The 75-page agreement was six years in the making and an ‘arduous’ process, according to Perlmutter, who sought to provide a space ‘to protect and give conditions where people can work at their best.’

‘[The agreement] opens doors for documentary and animation directors across the country to join a community… it provides comprehensive benefits,’ said Gunnarson during the ceremony, adding that filmmakers ‘don’t usually think about these things’ as they are too creatively involved in the filmmaking process.

The DGC and NFB say the deal provides strong protection and fair compensation, while being mindful of the restraints and public service mandate of the NFB.

‘We are hoping to use this agreement as an organizing tool or a template to help other directors in the private sector who do not have union protection,’ added the DGC director of director affairs Brian Baker, who also joined his colleagues at the ceremony.

About The Author
Managing editor with realscreen publication, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Darah is an award-winning journalist who has spent over two decades covering a wide range of issues from real estate and urban development to immigration, politics and human rights, primarily with The Vancouver Sun. Prior to joining realscreen, she was editor of Stream Daily, realscreen's sister publication covering the dynamic global digital video industry. She also served a stint as a war reporter in Afghanistan for television and print, and was a national business blogger with Yahoo Canada.

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