Screening Room

MIPCOM Picks 2009 – Extreme Ice

World renowned nature photographer James Balog was something of a skeptic when it came to the concept of global warming. But when he had the opportunity to accompany a team of scientists and shoot in some of the world's most dangerous polar regions, his tune decidedly changed.
September 30, 2009


World renowned nature photographer James Balog was something of a skeptic when it came to the concept of global warming. But when he had the opportunity to accompany a team of scientists and shoot in some of the world’s most dangerous polar regions, his tune decidedly changed. Extreme Ice follows Balog and team as they utilize timelapse photography – cameras shooting at one frame per daylight hour over the course of three years – as part of a comprehensive study of the cryosphere. The images revealed are beautiful yet undeniably troubling, as collapsing glaciers and shattering ice sheets signal the impending arrival of a most unwelcome future.

Partners: National Geographic Television for Nova (PBS) & National Geographic Channels International, distributed by NGTI

Length: 1 x 52 minutes
Aired: Late March, 2009 (Nova)
Rights available: All worldwide excluding U.S.

About The Author
Senior staff writer Frederick Blichert comes to realscreen with a background as a journalist and freelance film critic. He has previously written for VICE, Paste Magazine, Senses of Cinema, Xtra, Canadian Cinematographer and elsewhere. He holds a Master of Arts in film studies from Carleton University and a Master of Journalism from the University of British Columbia.

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