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‘Extreme Makeover’ scales down on the extreme

ABC's Extreme Makeover: Home Edition has built its success on the feel good moment when a lavish gigantic home is revealed to a family down on its luck. But some of those families are finding themselves stuck with huge utility bills, mortgage payments and tax assessments once the cameras are gone. The Wall Street Journal talks to Endemol USA's Conrad Ricketts, an executive producer for the show, about its move to downsize the excess and scale back.
April 6, 2010

ABC’s Extreme Makeover: Home Edition has built its success on the feel good moment when a lavish gigantic home is revealed to a family down on its luck. But some of those families are finding themselves stuck with huge utility bills, mortgage payments and tax assessments once the cameras are gone. The Wall Street Journal talks to Endemol USA’s Conrad Ricketts, an executive producer for the show, about its move to downsize the excess and scale back.

About The Author
Barry Walsh is editor and content director for realscreen, and has served as editor of the publication since 2009. With a career in entertainment media that spans two decades, prior to realscreen, he held the associate editor post for now defunct sister publication Boards, which focused on the advertising and commercial production industries. Before Boards, he served as editor of Canadian Music Network, a weekly music industry trade, and as music editor for HMV.com. As content director, he also oversees the development of content for the brand's market-leading events, the Realscreen Summit and Realscreen West, as well as new content initiatives.

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