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‘Extreme Makeover’ scales down on the extreme

ABC's Extreme Makeover: Home Edition has built its success on the feel good moment when a lavish gigantic home is revealed to a family down on its luck. But some of those families are finding themselves stuck with huge utility bills, mortgage payments and tax assessments once the cameras are gone. The Wall Street Journal talks to Endemol USA's Conrad Ricketts, an executive producer for the show, about its move to downsize the excess and scale back.
April 6, 2010

ABC’s Extreme Makeover: Home Edition has built its success on the feel good moment when a lavish gigantic home is revealed to a family down on its luck. But some of those families are finding themselves stuck with huge utility bills, mortgage payments and tax assessments once the cameras are gone. The Wall Street Journal talks to Endemol USA’s Conrad Ricketts, an executive producer for the show, about its move to downsize the excess and scale back.

About The Author
Meagan Kashty is an associate editor of realscreen, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Meagan is an award-winning business journalist. Prior to joining the realscreen team, Meagan was online editor of Canadian Grocer, named Magazine of the Year at the 2015 Canadian Business Media Awards. She can be reached at mkashty@brunico.com, and you can follow her on Twitter @MegKashty

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