Screening Room

MIPCOM Picks 2010: Rush – Beyond the Lighted Stage

On first glance, the trio of bassist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson and drummer Neil Peart may seem like the least likely band to inspire slavish devotion from millions of fans worldwide.
September 29, 2010


On first glance, the trio of bassist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson and drummer Neil Peart may seem like the least likely band to inspire slavish devotion from millions of fans worldwide. Rush deals primarily in progressive rock, a sub-genre that has been known to feature songs that can last for 12 minutes (or the length of four Black Eyed Peas tunes). It’s a form of music that calls for excellent musicianship and flights of lyrical fancy; hence, it doesn’t trouble radio playlists very often. Despite all of that, this legendary Canadian band is third for most consecutive gold and platinum albums behind The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, and has lasted for a mind-boggling 40 years. This doc, lovingly crafted by Scot McFayden and Sam Dunn (Metal: A Headbanger’s Journey and Iron Maiden: Flight 666) features candid interviews with the band and some of its famous fans (among them, Kiss’ Gene Simmons) and archival footage that obsessive fans will swoon over. But fear not – you won’t need to know who ‘By-Tor and the Snow Dog’ are to appreciate this story of the world’s biggest cult band.
Partners: Banger Films, distributed by Tricon Films & Television (Toronto)
Length: 106 minutes
Premiered: Tribeca, 2010
Rights available: Worldwide TV broadcast rights, excluding N.A.

About The Author
Selina Chignall joins the realscreen team as a staff writer. Prior to working with rs, she covered lobbying activity at Hill Times Publishing. She also spent a year covering the Hill as a journalist with iPolitics. Her beat focused on youth, education, democratic reform, innovation and infrastructure. She holds a Master of Arts in Journalism from Western University and a Honours Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto.

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