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Stewart Purvis calls for Communications Act changes in RTS Fleming Memorial Lecture

In the speech, Calling Time on Analogue Regulation, for the RTS Fleming Memorial Lecture, Stewart Purvis made proposals for the next Communications Act. The former Ofcom partner and ITN CEO and currently the professor of journalism at City University London, proposed, 'The (ITV) licensees should be invited to sign up for a clearly defined pattern of content for the nations and regions for ten years with no annual renegotiation downwards and in return the licenses will be rolled over.' He went on to the advertising, and suggested that local TV should experiment with a different system for advertising minuteage and allow a PBS-model of sponsorship around news programing. Purvis also proposed that local TV and radio should be allowed to operate a self-regulatory model, and also proposed that statutory regulation should remain for incitement to crime, racial hatred, the protection of children and unwinnable competitions. Purvis also said that complaints about lesser complaints should be handled by a self-regulatory body instead of Ofcom.
November 12, 2010

In the speech, Calling Time on Analogue Regulation, for the RTS Fleming Memorial Lecture, Stewart Purvis made proposals for the next Communications Act. The former Ofcom partner and ITN CEO and currently the professor of journalism at City University London, proposed, ‘The (ITV) licensees should be invited to sign up for a clearly defined pattern of content for the nations and regions for ten years with no annual renegotiation downwards and in return the licenses will be rolled over.’ He went on to advertising, and suggested that local TV should experiment with a different system for advertising minuteage and allow a PBS-model of sponsorship around news programing. Purvis also proposed that local TV and radio should be allowed to operate a self-regulatory model, and that statutory regulation should remain for incitement to crime, racial hatred, the protection of children and unwinnable competitions, but that lesser complaints should be handled by a self-regulatory body instead of Ofcom.

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