Docs

Kroll Fund calls for doc submissions

The Lynn and Jules Kroll Fund for Jewish Documentary Film is calling for applications for docs "that promote thoughtful consideration of Jewish history, life, culture, and identity," with a July 22 deadline for entry and more than US$100,000 on offer.
July 11, 2011

The Lynn and Jules Kroll Fund for Jewish Documentary Film (LJK) is calling for applications for docs “that promote thoughtful consideration of Jewish history, life, culture, and identity,” with a July 22 deadline for entry and more than US$100,000 on offer.

Grants from the Fund, which is backed by the Foundation for Jewish Culture, must be used for projects in post-production at the time of the application.

In the past, grants have generally ranged in size from US$15,000 to US$35,000, with the largest grant being US$50,000.

Last year the LJK fund granted US$140,000 to five documentaries, ensuring their delivery to film festivals, TV and other distribution outlets.

The grants are designed to enable filmmakers to pay license fees for archival footage, complete additional shooting, and reach a wider audience through outreach and engagement strategies.

The five 2010 grantees included Sam Ball’s Joann Sfar Draws From Memory, a portrait of one of France’s most celebrated graphic novelists; Nancy Kates’ Regarding Susan Sontag, which looks at the life and work of the late American writer; and The Hangman, Netalie Braun and Avigail Sperber’s chronicle of Adolf Eichmann’s executioner.

The US$140,000 issued last year was an increase on the US$120,000 issued to five docs in 2009.

A filmmaker wishing to apply must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident (director or producer); be in postproduction at the time of application; be an individual or a non-profit organization with federal tax exempt status; have creative, editorial, and budgetary control of the proposed project; and own the copyright of the completed film.

Those interested can see the 2011 guidelines here and apply here.

About The Author
Managing editor with realscreen publication, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Darah is an award-winning journalist who has spent over two decades covering a wide range of issues from real estate and urban development to immigration, politics and human rights, primarily with The Vancouver Sun. Prior to joining realscreen, she was editor of Stream Daily, realscreen's sister publication covering the dynamic global digital video industry. She also served a stint as a war reporter in Afghanistan for television and print, and was a national business blogger with Yahoo Canada.

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