Docs

Docs on their way to Raindance fest

Non-fiction films from Bruce McDonald and Vice, and world premieres including Khazar Fatemi's Where My Heart Beats are part of the roster for the 19th edition of the European indie film fest, taking place in London from September 28 to October 9.
September 6, 2011

Non-fiction films from Bruce McDonald and Vice, and world premieres including Khazar Fatemi’s Where My Heart Beats are part of the roster for the 19th edition of the Raindance Film Festival, taking place in London from September 28 to October 9.

The documentary strand for the European indie film fest will include Music From the Big House, McDonald’s film following blues artist Rita Chiarelli as she travels to Louisiana’s Maximum Security Penitentiary, once the bloodiest prison in America, to play for its inmates.

European premieres include How to Start a Revolution, directed by Ruaridh Arrow and featuring Gene Sharp, the man whose publications have been used by numerous international movements to promote and facilitate non-violent revolution; and the docudrama Leaving Baghdad from Iraqi-born filmmaker Koutaiba Al-Janabi, which combines dramatic narrative and archive footage to tell the story of Saddam Hussein’s personal cameraman trying to leave Iraq in the late Nineties.

Making its world premiere at the fest is Where My Heart Beats from Swedish journalist and former refugee Khazar Fatemi, who returns to her childhood home of Afghanistan for the first time in 20 years.

Youth media brand Vice is bringing three docs to the festival, including Roseboy, which examines the phenomenon of celebrity super-fans; and two entries from the Vice Guide To… series, including a look at ongoing tensions in Belfast and an examination of the mining of the ‘conflict mineral’ coltan in DR Congo.

Also on the doc schedule are Holy Rollers from Bryan Storkel, which follows a blackjack team comprised of devout Christians; and Mirko Pincelli’s Uspomene 677, which tells the story of the 677 concentration camps established during the Bosnian war.

The Raindance Film Festival showcases features, docs and shorts from around the world with a leaning towards independent cinema and directorial debuts. More information on the full roster can be found at the Raindance site.

About The Author
Senior staff writer Frederick Blichert comes to realscreen with a background as a journalist and freelance film critic. He has previously written for VICE, Paste Magazine, Senses of Cinema, Xtra, Canadian Cinematographer and elsewhere. He holds a Master of Arts in film studies from Carleton University and a Master of Journalism from the University of British Columbia.

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