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September Films hires BBC exec for head of development role

UK indie September Films has hired Simon Broadley (pictured) for the newly created role of head of development, while its parent company DCD Media has unveiled a slate of new factual titles for MIPCOM next month.
September 22, 2011

UK indie September Films (Penn & Teller: Fool Us) has hired Simon Broadley (pictured) for the newly created role of head of development, while its parent company DCD Media has unveiled a slate of new factual titles for MIPCOM next month.

Broadley joins September Films from the BBC’s Birmingham office, where he was most recently head of development. He starts the new role on October 10, based in London, and will be leading September’s team charged with developing entertainment and factual entertainment formats.

Sammy Nourmand, CEO of September Films, said: “Simon’s an exciting addition to September’s creative family. He has an infectious enthusiasm, great experience and the ability to think laterally that will help grow and diversify September’s existing programming.”

The appointment comes with September’s owner DCD Media unveiling its factual and fact ent slate for MIPCOM 2011.

New and returning programming from DCD’s distribution arm, DCD Rights, will include primetime entertainment magic show Penn & Teller: Fool Us (now 9 x 60-minutes), which has been sold to ABC Networks Australia and BBC Worldwide for multiple territories including Scandinavia, Latin America and Africa, and with format deals currently in negotiation in the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

Other titles heading to Cannes include Destination Fear (13 x 30-minutes), Dangerous Drivers’ School (6 x 60-minutes), Vet School (6 x 30-minutes), and Amazing Underground Secrets (3 x 60-minutes). The latter is a series promising to reveal “a whole other world beneath our feet,” exploring tunnels and caves.

Elsewhere, Pub Dig (4 x 45-minutes) from Oxford Scientific Films sees presenter Rory McGrath and archaeologist Paul Blinkhorn seeking out Britain’s greatest alehouses to explore the UK’s turbulent past; while The Prime of Miss Jane Austen (1 x 60-minutes) from Matchlight for BBC2) marks the 200th anniversary of the publication of Jane Austen’s first novel Sense and Sensibility.

Finally, Josie: My Cancer Curse is a one-hour documentary following an 18-year-old whose mother carries a hereditary gene that has increased her chance of getting breast cancer to 80%; while Glitterboys & Ganglands (1 x 60-minutes) sees 14 contestants battle it out for the title of Miss Gay Western Cape in South Africa’s biggest female impersonator pageant.

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