Docs

Cinema Eye says Hell Yeah to “Paradise Lost” directing duo

Paradise Lost directors Bruce Sinofsky and Joe Berlinger (pictured left and right respectively) will be the first recipients of a new, periodic award from the Cinema Eye Honors for Nonfiction Filmmaking, the Hell Yeah prize, which celebrates filmmakers who have created artistic works that have also had significant, real-world impact.
November 3, 2011

Paradise Lost directors Bruce Sinofsky and Joe Berlinger (pictured left and right respectively) are set to be the first recipients of the Hell Yeah Prize – a new, periodic award from the Cinema Eye Honors for Nonfiction Filmmaking which celebrates filmmakers who have created artistic works that have also had significant, real-world impact.

The inaugural award will be presented on January 11, 2012 at the fifth annual Cinema Eye Honors ceremony to be held at the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, New York. A screening of the latest film in the Paradise Lost trilogy – Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory – will take place on January 10, also at the Museum of the Moving Image, and the film will have its HBO premiere later in January 2012.

“The mission of Cinema Eye is to prioritize outstanding artistry and craft in the field of documentary,” Cinema Eye Honors co-chair Esther Robinson said of the new award. “We wanted to find a way to recognize those films and filmmakers that excel at the highest levels to create great art and, as a result, also happen to affect change in the real world that is measurable.

“Joe and Bruce’s Paradise Lost trilogy – a two-decade investigation of an outrageous case of wrongful prosecution and conviction – defines this award perfectly.”

Berlinger added: “To be given the opportunity to work on a series of films that had such a tangible result as the release of the wrongfully convicted West Memphis Three from prison is enough of a reward for any filmmaker, so to be singled out for this inaugural Hell Yeah award is truly inspiring.”

About The Author
Managing editor with realscreen publication, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Darah is an award-winning journalist who has spent over two decades covering a wide range of issues from real estate and urban development to immigration, politics and human rights, primarily with The Vancouver Sun. Prior to joining realscreen, she was editor of Stream Daily, realscreen's sister publication covering the dynamic global digital video industry. She also served a stint as a war reporter in Afghanistan for television and print, and was a national business blogger with Yahoo Canada.

Menu

Search