Screening Room

MIPCOM Picks 2012: American Tiger

Contrary to what many of us might believe, most tigers today are not prowling wild jungles in search of their next meal, but are living in captivity, and not necessarily in zoos.
September 25, 2012

Partners: Périphéria Productions in association with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation; distributed by Filmoption International

Length: 1 x 45 minutes

Aired: February 2012 (‘The Nature of Things,’ CBC, Canada)

Rights available: Worldwide, excluding Canada

Contrary to what many of us might believe, most tigers today are not prowling wild jungles in search of their next meal, but are living in captivity, and not necessarily in zoos. Some experts say that the number of tigers living in the United States may be nearly double that of those in the wild, and the majority of them are privately owned. This special, non-hunting cat is living longer than its counterparts in the wild, and may provide some genetic information that can help save wild tigers on the verge of extinction. But with six sub-species of tiger potentially facing that fate, is private ownership something to be encouraged or eradicated?

About The Author
Managing editor with realscreen publication, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Darah is an award-winning journalist who has spent over two decades covering a wide range of issues from real estate and urban development to immigration, politics and human rights, primarily with The Vancouver Sun. Prior to joining realscreen, she was editor of Stream Daily, realscreen's sister publication covering the dynamic global digital video industry. She also served a stint as a war reporter in Afghanistan for television and print, and was a national business blogger with Yahoo Canada.

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