Docs

Screen Australia launches Indigenous doc fund

Funding body Screen Australia is launching a feature documentary initiative valued at AUD$738,000 (US$583,600) and aimed exclusively at Indigenous filmmakers with production-ready projects.
May 11, 2015

Funding body Screen Australia is launching a feature documentary fund valued at AUD$738,000 (US$583,600) and aimed exclusively at Indigenous filmmakers with production-ready projects.

The Indigenous Feature Documentary Initiative - a collaboration between Screen Australia, the Adelaide Film Festival, post-production outfit KOJO and the National Film and Sound Archive (NFSA) – provides one selected feature-length project with funding and resources valued at $738,000, which includes $600,000 in funding from Screen Australia and the Adelaide Film Festival Investment Fund, as well as post-production support and access to the NFSA archives.

The chosen Indigenous filmmaker and producer team will also have the chance to premiere their film at the 2017 Adelaide Film Festival.

Though marketplace commitment is not required, projects need to “demonstrate a highly developed understanding of how they will reach and engage their target market and audience,” according to a release issued by Screen Australia.

In addition, the initiative is looking for documentaries with innovative observational and/or social justice themes with “a strong creative vision,” with examples including such docs as Hoop Dreams and Rich Hill, as well as The Thin Blue Line and The Tall Man.

“We are looking for big screen ideas of national interest that will provoke debate and that will have the ability to change people’s emotions and perspectives of the Indigenous Australian experience,” said Penny Smallacombe, Screen Australia’s head of Indigenous, in a statement.

The deadline for applications is June 26. For more information, please click here.

About The Author
Managing editor with realscreen publication, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Darah is an award-winning journalist who has spent over two decades covering a wide range of issues from real estate and urban development to immigration, politics and human rights, primarily with The Vancouver Sun. Prior to joining realscreen, she was editor of Stream Daily, realscreen's sister publication covering the dynamic global digital video industry. She also served a stint as a war reporter in Afghanistan for television and print, and was a national business blogger with Yahoo Canada.

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