EDN honors ARTE France web production head

ARTE France's head of web and transmedia productions, Marianne Lévy-Leblond (pictured), has been honored with the 2016 EDN Award from the European Documentary Network.
March 18, 2016

Marianne Lévy-Leblond (pictured), head of web and transmedia productions at ARTE France, has been honored with the 2016 EDN Award from the European Documentary Network (EDN).

The award recognizes Lévy-Leblond’s contributions to the development of the European documentary culture through her work in the digital and interactive doc spaces. She was presented with the award at a ceremony during the EDN workshop “Docs in Thessaloniki” earlier today (March 18).

Lévy-Leblond, who previously spent 10 years as a commissioning editor at ARTE France, has been credited with having commissioned and supported such titles as Do Not Track, a web project exploring how data shared by users on the web benefits large corporations; interactive doc Alma, on preventing violence in war-torn Guatemala; and webseries Affaires Familiales.

Past EDN Award recipients include Caspar Sonnen (2015); Tue Steen Müller (2014); Stefano Tealdi and Joan Gonzales (2013); Diana El Jeiroudi, Orwa Nyrabia and the Dox Box (2012); Dimitri Eipides, director of the Thessaloniki Documentary Festival (2011); and the Iranian Documentary Filmmakers Association (2010).

The EDN is a member-based organization for individuals working within documentary film and television. The organization currently has approximately 1,000 members from more than 60 countries.

“Marianne Lévy-Leblond has been part of creating structures that many of us will operate in, in our future work with documentary stories,” said Ove Rishøj Jensen, a consultant with EDN Film and Media, in a statement. “She had been part of developing projects that we in the future will refer to as early interactive classics.”

Lévy-Leblond added: “Interactive documentary is not a geek affair, it can bring stories to life from a world that is far away when seen from our sometimes very abstract western preoccupations. And it can do so by using these new tools to make viewers meet characters on very different terms from the ones we’re used to through papers or television.”

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Jonathan Paul is a Toronto-based writer into creativity, content, advertising, tech, comics, video games, film, TV, time and space travel.