Docs

“Cameraperson,” “Twelve Landscapes” take DOXA prizes

Kirsten Johnson's Cameraperson (pictured) and Brett Story's The Prison in Twelve Landscapes were awarded feature doc and Canadian doc prizes, respectively, at the 2016 DOXA Documentary Film Festival in Vancouver.
May 16, 2016

Kirsten Johnson’s Cameraperson (pictured) and Brett Story’s The Prison in Twelve Landscapes were awarded feature doc and Canadian doc prizes, respectively, at the 2016 DOXA Documentary Film Festival in Vancouver.

The festival’s feature documentary award went to Johnson’s Cameraperson, in which the cinematographer points the camera at her own career. The feature doc jury consisted of David Beers, Shaun Inouye and Barbara Chirinos.

“A masterful, uniquely conceived documentary that provides both an insightful look at being a ‘witness’ and a slowly unfurling, affecting memoir of a mother and daughter,” read a statement from the jury.

Claire Simon received an honorable mention for her film Le Bois dont les rêves sont faits, which offers a deep investigation into both people and place.

Meanwhile, Story’s The Prison in Twelve Landscapes – which details America’s unhealthy addiction to mass incarceration – took home two awards, which included The Colin Low Award for Canadian Documentary and The Alliance of Women Film Journalists EDA Award for Best Female Directed Film.

Jury members for the Canadian documentary prize included Janice Ungano, Andrea Warner and Kathleen Jayme, while the best female-directed film award was juried by Jennifer Merin, Katherine Monk and Karen Martin.

“A gorgeous, raw, nuanced film that left us breathless, broken and irate,” read the jury statement.

Tamara Herman and Susi Porter-Bopp’s We Call Them Intruders, which profiles the Canadian mining industry in rural parts of Eastern and Southern Africa, received The Nigel Moore Award for Youth Programming.

Finally, the short documentary award went to Skye Fitzgerald‘s 50 Feet from Syria, which follows a surgeon as he travels to Turkey’s border with Syria to operate on victims from the country’s civil war, while The EDA Award for Best Short Documentary was captured by Heidi Janz and Eva Colmer’s We Regret to Inform You…, which puts the disabled/able-bodied dichotomy under new scrutiny.

The festival ran from May 5 to 15, and closed with an awards ceremony that took place alongside a closing gala presentation of Johnson’s Cameraperson on Saturday (May 14).

About The Author
Meagan Kashty is an associate editor of realscreen, an international print and online magazine that covers the non-fiction film and television industries. Meagan is an award-winning business journalist. Prior to joining the realscreen team, Meagan was online editor of Canadian Grocer, named Magazine of the Year at the 2015 Canadian Business Media Awards. She can be reached at mkashty@brunico.com, and you can follow her on Twitter @MegKashty

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