‘POV,’ NYT to explore race with “Embedded Mediamakers”

PBS doc strand 'POV' and The New York Times have named Bayeté Ross Smith (left), Logan Jaffe (center) and Saleem Reshamwala (right) as the three digital producers for the Embedded Mediamaker project.
August 22, 2016

PBS documentary strand ‘POV’ and The New York Times have unveiled the three digital producers for the Embedded Mediamaker project.

While the two organizations had originally set out to support one mediamaker, ‘POV’ and the Times have selected Bayeté Ross Smith (pictured, left), Logan Jaffe (center) and Saleem Reshamwala (right) to develop doc and interactive conversations about race with Times writers, editors and visual storytellers involved in Race/Related, a newsletter and reporting project exploring race today.

Ross Smith, an alumnus of POV Digital Lab, will embed himself within The New York Times for the duration of 20 weeks beginning today (August 22), while Jaffe and Reshamwala will each spend 10 weeks at the news organization beginning September 6.

Jaffe currently serves as a producer for WBEZ’s news-gathering experiment Curious City, while Reshamwala is the creator of the PBS Digital Studios series Beat Making Lab.

PBS’s ‘POV’ and The New York Times have previously collaborated digitally on such documentary projects as The Men of Atalissa, Strangers at Sea and The Nipple Artist.

The Embedded Mediamaker project is funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. ‘POV’ previously won a MacArthur Award in 2013 for creative and effective institutions, which recognizes exceptional grantees demonstrating creativity and impact.

“Bayeté, Logan and Saleem are experienced journalists and creative storytellers who have all used new storytelling techniques to explore issues of race in ways that resonate with audiences,” said Nancy Gauss, executive director of video at The New York Times, in a statement.

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Jonathan Paul is a Toronto-based writer into creativity, content, advertising, tech, comics, video games, film, TV, time and space travel.