Docs

Barbara Kopple’s “FutureWork” to stream on Time Inc.

Time Inc. has partnered with charitable organization WorkingNation to distribute a new digital short docuseries from Academy Award-winning director Barbara Kopple across Fortune.com and Time.com. The four-part docuseries FutureWork will feature 10-minute ...
October 19, 2016

Time Inc. has partnered with charitable organization WorkingNation to distribute a new digital short docuseries from Academy Award-winning director Barbara Kopple across Fortune.com and Time.com.

The four-part docuseries FutureWork will feature 10-minute episodes that look to investigate the changes currently impacting the U.S. workforce and the various solutions to train workers for the new economy.

Episodes will focus on the shuttering of New York’s Eastman Kodak Company; non-profit organization Year Up, which looks to provide young adults employment opportunities; a technical education program developed by automaker Toyota in Kentucky; and youth tech competitions that serve as recruiting grounds for employers.

The films were commissioned by WorkingNation, a not-for-profit dedicated to raising awareness of America’s looming unemployment crisis and skills gap while helping to restore the middle class. 

FutureWork is exec produced by Joan Lynch and Melissa Panzer, who are leading WorkingNation’s production of original content.

Lynch previously served as VP and executive producer of content development at ESPN, overseeing the award-winning ’30 for 30′ docuseries. Panzer, meanwhile, is president of Don’t Panic Productions.

“There used to be tens of thousands of workers employed behind the scenes making the film we once used. Today digital technology requires far fewer. What happened to Kodak and Rochester is happening all over America in many ways,” said Kopple in a statement.

“On the surface, the rate of change is frightening. Through the people we met, I found that there is tremendous hope and resiliency,” she continued. “I learned something new about the human spirit as those most effected found new and even greater meaning as they transitioned to new careers amidst difficult circumstances.”

Watch episode one below:

About The Author
Daniele Alcinii is a news reporter at realscreen, the leading international publisher of non-fiction film and television industry news and content. He joins the rs team with journalism experience following a stint out west with Sun Media in Edmonton's Capital Region, and communications work in Melbourne, Australia and Toronto. You can follow him on Twitter at @danielealcinii.

Menu

Search