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BBC tackles evolution in “Mission Galapagos”

Why hammerhead sharks swim in massive schools and what two-meter-long sunfish do in the ocean depths are some of the scientific questions a team of science explorers will seek to ...
January 10, 2017

Why hammerhead sharks swim in massive schools and what two-meter-long sunfish do in the ocean depths are some of the scientific questions a team of science explorers will seek to answer in a newly commissioned BBC docuseries, Mission Galapagos.

Shot using portable x-ray machines, a LiDAR scanning sensor (to produce 3D images), and various underwater tools, the series (3 x 60) promises to provide a new look at some of the diverse life found on and around the Galapagos Islands, an archipelago of volcanic islands off the coast of Ecuador.

Mission Galapagos, a co-pro from UK indie Atlantic Productions and Alucia Productions, is set to premiere on BBC1 in the first quarter of 2017 and will be presented by Liz Bonnin. The series’ producer is Anthony Geffen.

The Galapagos have fascinated scientists since Charles Darwin’s 1831 trip aboard the HMS Beagle. Since then they’ve has been the staging grounds for numerous scientific expeditions charting the evolutionary paths taken by the resident flora and fauna.

Mission Galapagos takes the science expedition format to a new level. This is a unique opportunity to explore one of the world’s most exciting natural habitats, at a crucial time. When the animals and islands are facing an uncertain future…This series promises to be a gripping adventure full of scientific firsts – a genuine voyage of discovery,” said Craig Hunter, natural history commissioning editor at BBC, in a statement.

The series is set to be distributed globally by BBC Worldwide.

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