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Jim Parsons to narrate Discovery’s “First in Human”

Discovery Channel has recruited award-winning actor and comedian Jim Parsons to narrate a forthcoming three-part docuseries that provides unprecedented access inside the National Institutes of Health’s Building 10. Produced by McGee ...
January 16, 2017

Discovery Channel has recruited award-winning actor and comedian Jim Parsons to narrate a forthcoming three-part docuseries that provides unprecedented access inside the National Institutes of Health’s Building 10.

Produced by McGee Media, First in Human: The Trials of Building 10 ventures into the Bethesda, Maryland institution to reveal how medical breakthroughs evolve out of state-of-the-art research labs and transition into the hands of medical professionals worldwide.

The series, scheduled to premiere May 18 at 9 p.m. ET/PT, examines the lives of the doctors, researchers, staff and patients working together on human trials to find cures and treatments for diseases ranging from leukemia and sickle cell disease, to the rarest illnesses. Cameras will follow patients throughout their entire trial.

Previous trials in the building led to the development of modern chemotherapy treatments, the first treatments for HIV/AIDS, the first successful gene therapy and the development of the technique to keep the blood supply clean and safe from viruses.

The series is directed by John Hoffman, who also serves as a producer alongside Beth Wichterich and Michael Epstein. Executive producers on the series include Dyllan McGee, Jim Parsons, Todd Spiewak and Eric Norsoph. Discovery’s Jon Bardin¬†serves as supervising producer.

“NIH’s Building 10 has given generations hope when they need it most,” said Rich Ross, Group president of Discovery Channel, Animal Planet, Science Channel and Velocity, said in a statement.¬†“We are proud that the NIH has invited Discovery inside their doors for an unvarnished look at how these brave men and women work hand in hand with their doctors and technologists to seek cures to the most confounding diseases that exist.”

“Because of the very nature of first in human trials, most of the patients who enter Building 10 to enroll in them are remarkably unique: all standard care out in the world has failed them,” added Hoffman. “What was most powerful about embedding in Building 10 and following these trials was observing how the doctors and patients came to rely on each other in a true partnership to advance medicine.”

About The Author
Daniele Alcinii is a news reporter at realscreen, the leading international publisher of non-fiction film and television industry news and content. He joins the rs team with journalism experience following a stint out west with Sun Media in Edmonton's Capital Region, and communications work in Melbourne, Australia and Toronto. You can follow him on Twitter at @danielealcinii.

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