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A&E preps “60 Days In” for seasons three and four

A&E has signed on for another two round behind bars: The popular series 60 Days In has been renewed for another two seasons, taking it up to four in total. Set in Atlanta’s ...
January 30, 2017

A&E has signed on for another two round behind bars: The popular series 60 Days In has been renewed for another two seasons, taking it up to four in total.

Set in Atlanta’s Fulton County Jail — one of the country’s most dangerous facilities, according to a release — the series will see undercover participants head into lock-up for two months. This includes a special education teacher who works with at-risk youth, a man fighting back against the system he believes has failed African-Americans, a former corrections officer and a woman who met her husband while he was incarcerated.

60 Days In is produced by Lucky 8 TV. Executive producers include Gregory Henry, Kimberly Woodard, Jeff Grogan, Isaac Holub and Kelly McClurking (for Lucky 8), as well as Elaine Frontain Bryant, Shelly Tatro and Brad Holcman (for A&E). The series has since been distributed into 100 territories worldwide on A&E and Crime + Investigation.

Like the first two seasons, three and four were shot back-to-back. The premiere episode for season three is set air March 2 at 9 p.m. (ET/PT).

The first season of the series, set in Clark County, Indiana, was conceived when the head jailer wanted to put undercover civilians behind bars to expose the root of underlying issues.

While he wouldn’t divulge specific numbers, Lucky 8 TV co-founder Henry had previously told realscreen that 60 Days In was an expensive series:  The four-month production involved a control room staffed 24/7 by 16 people per shift. The crew recorded more than two petabytes of audio (more than the entire iTunes Library). The second season — which shot before the first aired in order to keep everyone in the dark since only the chief jailer was in on the ruse — saw an increase in training and background checks for the cast members.

And it seemed to pay off: The series was the top unscripted crime series in 2016 among the 25 to 45 demo, with the premiere episode pulling in more than one million viewers.

About The Author
Senior staff writer Frederick Blichert comes to realscreen with a background as a journalist and freelance film critic. He has previously written for VICE, Paste Magazine, Senses of Cinema, Xtra, Canadian Cinematographer and elsewhere. He holds a Master of Arts in film studies from Carleton University and a Master of Journalism from the University of British Columbia.

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