Docs

“Bobbi Jene,” “Suitable Girl” win at Tribeca

Elvira Lind‘s cinéma vérité film Bobbi Jene and Sarita Khurana and Smriti Mundhra’s A Suitable Girl (pictured) are among the documentary winners at the 16th annual Tribeca Film Festival. Lind’s Bobbi ...
April 28, 2017

Elvira Lind‘s cinéma vérité film Bobbi Jene and Sarita Khurana and Smriti Mundhra’s A Suitable Girl (pictured) are among the documentary winners at the 16th annual Tribeca Film Festival.

Lind’s Bobbi Jene, which follows the dancer Bobbi Jene Smith as she moved back the U.S. from Israel, took home top honors from the New York-set festival, claiming the Best Documentary Feature title in the Documentary Competition as well as a prize of US$20,000.

The 96-minute film also picked up awards in the Best Documentary Cinematography (Elvira Lind) and Best Documentary Editing (Adam Nielson) categories, receiving $2,500 for each prize.

The Albert Maysles New Documentary Director Award, meanwhile, was handed out to Khurana and Mundhra’s A Suitable Girl, tracing three women in India struggling to maintain their identities amid pressures to get married. The directing partners also received a $10,000 cash prize.

Special Jury Mentions were given to Jamie Meltzer’s True Conviction for Best Documentary Feature and Greg Campbell’s Hondros for the Albert Maysles New Documentary Director Award.

The Best Documentary Short award and $5,000 prize went to Ben Holman’s The Good Fight, which documents a man’s work to transform the future of his Brazilian favela community through boxing.

Special Jury Mention went to Josh Izenberg and Wynn Padula’s Resurface.

For the fifth year, Tribeca revealed the recipient of the Storyscapes Award, recognizing groundbreaking approaches in storytelling and technology, and the Tribeca X Award, a juried award for branded storytelling.

The Storyscapes Award was given to Marshmallow Laser Feast’s Treehugger: Wawona, which was created by Barnaby Steel, Ersin Han Ersin and Robin McNicholas. The interactive installation, which receives $10,000, combined art, science, data and environmentalism to transport users into a secretive tree world in which the longer someone hugged the tree, the deeper they drifted into “treetime”.

Finally, the Tribeca X Award, selected from more than 600 entrants of scripted and documentary work, went to Zachary Heinzerling‘s Chris Fonseca: Keep It Moving for Smirnoff Ice. The short film centers on a deaf choreographer who challenges his deaf students to express themselves through the art of dance.

In total, the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival included 97 feature length films, 57 short films and 30 immersive storytelling projects from 41 countries.

The winners of the Audience Awards, which are determined by audience votes throughout the festival via the Tribeca app, will be announced on April 29.

The festival began April 19 and runs through April 30.

About The Author
Selina Chignall joins the realscreen team as a staff writer. Prior to working with rs, she covered lobbying activity at Hill Times Publishing. She also spent a year covering the Hill as a journalist with iPolitics. Her beat focused on youth, education, democratic reform, innovation and infrastructure. She holds a Master of Arts in Journalism from Western University and a Honours Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto.

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