People/Biz

Writers Guild and AMPTP strike a deal (not a strike)

The Writers Guilds of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers have brokered a tentative deal on terms for a new three-year collective bargaining agreement. With the agreement, ...
May 2, 2017

The Writers Guilds of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers have brokered a tentative deal on terms for a new three-year collective bargaining agreement.

With the agreement, WGA union members will see an increase in contribution to their health plans, have job protection while on parental leave and expand their protection in options and exclusivity.

“We also made unprecedented gains on the issue of short seasons in television, winning a definition — which has never before existed in our MBA — of 2.4 weeks of work for each episodic fee,” the Guilds’ negotiating committee said in an online statement posted Tuesday (May 2).

Writer-producers can now expect additional payment for any work beyond that time frame.

The members also gain a 15% increase in pay TV residuals, a roughly $15 million bump in high-budget SVOD residuals and, for the first time ever, residuals for comedy-variety writers in pay TV.

Although the WGA said they didn’t get everything they wanted, with almost unanimous support from the writers, the Guild was able to achieve a deal that will net its members $130 million more over the life of the contract than they were expected to accept, the memo said.

As of Tuesday morning, there was no word from AMPTP about the negotiated contract.

The deal comes after the members of the Guild, the union representing writers in the motion picture, broadcast, cable and new media industries, overwhelmingly voted in favor of a strike (April 24), if an agreement could not be reached by the union and the studios when their contract was to expire on May 1.

 Image: “Writer’s Guild of America East Soladarit” (CC BY-SA 2.0) by John Edwards 2008

 

About The Author
Selina Chignall joins the realscreen team as a staff writer. Prior to working with rs, she covered lobbying activity at Hill Times Publishing. She also spent a year covering the Hill as a journalist with iPolitics. Her beat focused on youth, education, democratic reform, innovation and infrastructure. She holds a Master of Arts in Journalism from Western University and a Honours Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto.

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