Docs

Coming soon: “Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence,” “The Last Men in Aleppo”

In this week’s round-up, new non-fiction series and documentaries are slated to debut across PBS strands ‘POV’, History and National Geographic. American cable net History is gearing up to premiere the ...
July 6, 2017

In this week’s round-up, new non-fiction series and documentaries are slated to debut across PBS strands ‘POV’, History and National Geographic.

American cable net History is gearing up to premiere the two-hour special Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence on July 9 at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

Produced by Morningstar Entertainment, the special unveils original U.S. documents containing new information about the fate of the American legend, including a never-before-seen photograph presumed to be Earhart and Noonan after their crash. Former FBI Executive Director, Shawn Henry, leads a team of investigators in evaluating and testing the photograph with recognition and proportional comparison technology.

Feras Fayyad’s feature-length documentary The Last Men in Aleppo, meanwhile, will receive its national television debut on PBS television series POV on July 10 at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

Directed by Fayyad and co-directed and edited by Johannessen, in partnership with the Aleppo Media Center, the film offers a heart-wrenching truth, following volunteer men who formed the a rescue group that came to be known as “The White¬†Helmets” in the devastating war.

The Last Men in Aleppo will be the final of five films kicking off POV’s 30th season that focus on the Syrian war and refugee crisis.

Also debuting on POV will be Ido Haar’s Presenting Princess Shaw¬†on July 17 at 10 p.m.

The doc tells the story of New Orleans singing sensation Princess Shaw and her collaborator Kutiman, a musician in Israel who uses her YouTube videos to create something magical.

National Geographic will be premiering a two-hour global television event on July 9 at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT. In Earth Live, Nat Geo will be anchored in a New York studio and guided by hosts Jane Lynch and Phil Keoghan and will have 51 cameras shooting simultaneously in 25 different locations across 15 countries and 12 different time zones.

The production, by Bunim-Murray Productions, Berman Prooductions and Plimsoll Productions for National Geographic, will take viewers on a global journey and will be helmed by award-winning television producer Al Berman.

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