Docs

Exclusive clip: Science Channel’s “Mysteries of the Missing”

Ahead of the premiere of Science Channel’s upcoming series Mysteries of the Missing (premiering Aug.26), realscreen presents an exclusive clip. In an era where modern technology and surveillance monitors almost every detail of ...
August 25, 2017

Ahead of the premiere of Science Channel’s upcoming series Mysteries of the Missing (premiering Aug.26), realscreen presents an exclusive clip.

In an era where modern technology and surveillance monitors almost every detail of our lives, it seems inconceivable to us that something or someone could just disappear off the face of the Earth.

Produced by Wall to Wall, Mysteries Of The Missing looks at plausible explanations to some of the most perplexing disappearances of all time.

Investigators, scientists, and experts use cutting-edge technology to decode the unexplained and find answers to some of the most puzzling unresolved cold cases in history. The debut episode takes on one of the biggest aviation mysteries of the 21st century: Malaysian Airlines Flight 370.

Other high profiled vanishing acts include the three Alcatraz escapees who managed to flee the island fortress in 1962; the Lost Roanoke Colony in North Carolina; the unexplained cause of a 1908 explosion in an extremely remote part of Siberia that is said to have been the equivalent of a thousand atom bombs; and the notorious Bermuda triangle, among others.

Executive producers on the series are Jeremy Dear and Fred Hepburn for Wall to Wall. For Science Channel, Neil Laird is executive producer.

Hosted by Emmy-award winning actor Terry O’Quinn, Mysteries of the Missing premieres Aug. 26 at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

About The Author
Senior staff writer Frederick Blichert comes to realscreen with a background as a journalist and freelance film critic. He has previously written for VICE, Paste Magazine, Senses of Cinema, Xtra, Canadian Cinematographer and elsewhere. He holds a Master of Arts in film studies from Carleton University and a Master of Journalism from the University of British Columbia.

Menu

Search