Docs

Kirby Dick, Amy Ziering to produce Hollywood assault project

Oscar-nominated and Emmy-winning directors Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering have begun work on their latest project: a documentary set to expose systemic abuse and harassment in the entertainment industry. The untitled sexual assault ...
October 24, 2017

Oscar-nominated and Emmy-winning directors Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering have begun work on their latest project: a documentary set to expose systemic abuse and harassment in the entertainment industry.

The untitled sexual assault documentary, which is financed by Impact Partners, will examine abuse at the hands of predatory perpetrators within Hollywood, while also exploring the culture that enables and protects them. The film will also profile the emerging voices for change.

The film is presented by Impact Partners in association with the Artemis Rising Foundation and Shark Island Institute.

The announcement follows Harvey Weinstein‘s publicized firing from The Weinstein Company (TWC) amid a New York Times piece published Oct. 5, which detailed decades of sexual harassment accusations against the executive. 

The story, written by investigative reporters Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, cites numerous allegations of sexual harassment that are said to have occurred over the past three decades, stretching from his time overseeing Miramax Films to his more recent tenure with TWC. It also states that Weinstein reached at least eight legal settlements with women, according to two company officials that requested anonymity.

Documentaries, more than any other medium, bring an intensely moving investigative lens to controversial subject matter,” said Dick, in a statement. “What our film will capture, especially at this pivotal turning point in Hollywood history, is the underlying current of abuse and manipulation at the hands of power. Our film will also underscore the courage it takes to come forward and be a catalyst for change.”

The award-winning directors, who have previously worked together on The Invisible War and The Hunting Ground, have been attempting to create the as-yet titled project for a number of years. According to Zeiring, it was only after the Weinstein scandal broke that the pair were able to get enough industry people on the record to speak to allegations of sexual abuse.

“Distributors were unwilling to fund or release the film, and few people were willing to talk on the record,” Ziering said. “Then the Weinstein stories broke, and it’s like an invisible dam collapsed. People at long last are speaking out in large numbers, and we feel this industry, and the country, is finally ready for an unflinching film about the reality of sexual assault and harassment in Hollywood.”

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