People/Biz

Morgan Spurlock admits to sexual misconduct in essay

Supersize Me director Morgan Spurlock has admitted to incidences of sexual misconduct in a lengthy statement posted to his Twitter account. In the open letter titled I Am Part of the Problem, ...
December 14, 2017

Supersize Me director Morgan Spurlock has admitted to incidences of sexual misconduct in a lengthy statement posted to his Twitter account.

In the open letter titled I Am Part of the Problem, Spurlock recalled several past incidents “that parallel what we see everyday in the news”, referring to the recent flood of accusations made against powerful executives in the entertainment media and beyond.

The Academy Award-nominated filmmaker revealed that he was once accused of rape during his university years. And while there wasn’t an investigation into the matter, the woman named Spurlock by name in an essay read aloud to a short story writing class.

“In my mind, we’d been drinking all night and went back to my room,” Spurlock wrote. “We began fooling around, she pushed me off, then we laid in the bed and talked and laughed some more, and then began fooling around again. We took off our clothes. She said she didn’t want to have sex, so we laid together, and talked, and kissed, and laughed, and then we started having sex.”

Spurlock wrote that the woman began to cry and the pair ceased having sex. He said that he then rolled beside her trying to comfort her. “I thought I was doing ok, I believed she was feeling better. She believed she was raped.”

Spurlock, who serves as president of New York-based studio Warrior Poets, also recounted a previously settled sexual harassment claim made by a female employee “around eight years ago”.

“I would call my female assistant ‘hot pants’ or ‘sex pants’ when I was yelling to her from the other side of the office,” he said. “Something I thought was funny at the time, but then realized I had completely demeaned and belittled her to a place of non-existence.”

When the female employee departed the production company, she threatened to expose Spurlock’s misconduct if he refused to pay her a settlement.

“Being who I was, it was the last thing I wanted, so of course, I paid. I paid for peace of mind. I paid for her silence and cooperation. Most of all, I paid so I could remain who I was.”

Multiple attempts to reach representatives at Warrior Poets went unanswered.

Spurlock’s Warrior Poets has produced multiple award winning films, digital series and television programs. Spurlock has helmed such feature-length documentaries as Supersize Me, which earned him a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 2004; Supersize Me 2: Holy Chicken, recently acquired by YouTube Red following a world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival; The Greatest Movie Ever Sold; One Direction: This is Us; and Rats.

Also at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2017, Spurlock presented an episode from the eight-part series Cultureshock, produced by Warrior Poets in association with Entertainment Weekly and set to air on A&E in 2018.

About The Author
Barry Walsh is editor and content director for realscreen, and has served as editor of the publication since 2009. With a career in entertainment media that spans two decades, prior to realscreen, he held the associate editor post for now defunct sister publication Boards, which focused on the advertising and commercial production industries. Before Boards, he served as editor of Canadian Music Network, a weekly music industry trade, and as music editor for HMV.com. As content director, he also oversees the development of content for the brand's market-leading events, the Realscreen Summit and Realscreen West, as well as new content initiatives.

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