Docs

Coming Soon: “Trophy,” “I Am Not Your Negro”

In this week’s roundup, new unscripted series and documentaries are scheduled to debut across PBS’s ‘Independent Lens’, Science Channel CNN and Smithsonian Channel. Shaul Schwarz and Christina Clusiau’s Sundance-premiering big-game hunting ...
January 4, 2018

In this week’s roundup, new unscripted series and documentaries are scheduled to debut across PBS’s ‘Independent Lens’, Science Channel CNN and Smithsonian Channel.

Shaul Schwarz and Christina Clusiau’s Sundance-premiering big-game hunting and wildlife conservation documentary Trophy will make its broadcast debut on CNN this January.

The 108-minute doc explores the relationship between big-game hunting and wildlife conservation and takes viewers on an international visual safari, visiting the countries that are home to the most-prized African wildlife by big-game hunters: lion, buffalo, rhino, leopard and elephant. Every year, these endangered African species march closer towards extinction due to the global desire to consume these animals.

Trophy, which premieres on Jan. 14 at 9 p.m. ET/PT on CNN, explores most of the challenges of balancing conservation, sport, human population growth, and the commerce associated with big-game hunting. 

Elsewhere, American pubcaster PBS’s long-running doc strand ‘Independent Lens’ is preparing to share the television broadcast premiere of director Raoul Peck’s documentary I Am Not Your Negro(pictured).

The Academy Award-nominated doc is based on James Baldwin’s unfinished book, Remember This House, which chronicles the lives and successive assassinations of his friends Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. Narrated by acclaimed actor Samuel L. Jackson, the 93-minute film also looks at how the racial and economic inequality of the 1950s and 1960s has shaped attitudes about race in present day. I Am Not Your Negro debuts on ‘Independent Lens’ Jan. 15 at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

Meanwhile, Smithsonian Channel is preparing to dive into Atlantic Productions’ award-winning three-part natural history event special David Attenborough’s Great Barrier Reef.

The 3 x 60-minute oceanic series, which was originally commissioned by UK pubcaster BBC, employs pioneering camera technology and research to explore the world’s largest living structure and the biodiversity that thrives off of it. Among the techniques used are satellite scans of the reef’s 2,300 kilometers of living coral, as well as the use of high-tech macro lenses that capture microscopic creature. David Attenborough’s Great Barrier Reef airs across the American networkon Jan. 24 at 8 p.m. ET/PT.

Finally, Science Channel is scheduled to air Kikim Media’s technology-focused docuseries Silicon Valley: The Untold Story at the end of January.

Directed by Michael Schwarz and supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the three-part series will take a comprehensive look at the century-and-a-half history of Silicon Valley while revealing how the area became such a fertile ground for technological breakthroughs. Featured in the series will be interviews with some of the Valley’s most prominent innovators, including Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, WhatsApp co-founder Jan Koum, Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell  and Alphabet executive chair Eric Schmidt, among others. Silicon Valley: The Untold Story broadcasts at 8 p.m. ET/PT on Jan. 28.

About The Author
Daniele Alcinii is a news reporter at realscreen, the leading international publisher of non-fiction film and television industry news and content. He joins the rs team with journalism experience following a stint out west with Sun Media in Edmonton's Capital Region, and communications work in Melbourne, Australia and Toronto. You can follow him on Twitter at @danielealcinii.

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