Docs

Smithsonian Channel spotlights turbulent 1968 in upcoming film

Smithsonian Channel is diving deep into the Smithsonian Institute’s vaults to relive and explore the change, violence and tragedy that was 1968 in an upcoming film from The Biscuit Factory. Smithsonian ...
May 1, 2018

Smithsonian Channel is diving deep into the Smithsonian Institute’s vaults to relive and explore the change, violence and tragedy that was 1968 in an upcoming film from The Biscuit Factory.

Smithsonian Time Capsule: 1968 takes a look at the significance of a dozen objects the Smithsonian kept that captured those turbulent times, along with personal stories that transport audiences back to a specific time in ’68 that impacted history.

Featured onscreen is a veteran of the Tet Offensive who shares the story of his uniform he wore as he recounts surviving a deadly ambush, and astronaut Jim Lovell remembers Apollo 8 – the first manned spacecraft to land on the moon.

The film also recounts the civil rights movement with objects including the remains of a 1968 banner – hung in the National Museum of American History – made to commemorate the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. following his assassination.

Further objects include Pringles “newfangled” potato chips, as well as early mobile phones and the popularization of the Peace Sign.

To commemorate 1968, the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery will open the exhibition “One Year: 1968, An American Odyssey” on June 29.

The film is produced by Molly Hermann and Rob Lyall for The Biscuit Factory. Linda Goldman and David Royle serve as executive producers for Smithsonian Channel.

Smithsonian Time Capsule: 1968 premieres May 7 at 8 p.m. ET/PT on Smithsonian Channel.


Photo by Schulimson [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

About The Author
Senior staff writer Frederick Blichert comes to realscreen with a background as a journalist and freelance film critic. He has previously written for VICE, Paste Magazine, Senses of Cinema, Xtra, Canadian Cinematographer and elsewhere. He holds a Master of Arts in film studies from Carleton University and a Master of Journalism from the University of British Columbia.

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