People/Biz

CNN’s Anthony Bourdain dead at 61

Anthony Bourdain, host of CNN’s award-winning culinary travel series Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown, died Friday (June 8) at the age of 61. CNN confirmed Bourdain’s death, stating the cause was suicide. The chef and ...
June 8, 2018

Anthony Bourdain, host of CNN’s award-winning culinary travel series Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown, died Friday (June 8) at the age of 61.

CNN confirmed Bourdain’s death, stating the cause was suicide.

The chef and reality star had been traveling through Strasbourg, France for a forthcoming episode of Parts Unknown. He was discovered “unresponsive in his hotel room Friday morning” by friend and chef Eric Ripert, CNN reported.

“It is with extraordinary sadness we can confirm the death of our friend and colleague, Anthony Bourdain,” the network said in a statement. “His love of great adventure, new friends, fine food and drink and the remarkable stories of the world made him a unique storyteller.

“His talents never ceased to amaze us and we will miss him very much. Our thoughts and prayers are with his daughter and family at this incredibly difficult time.”

Bourdain first rose to fame with his New York Times bestselling book, Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000).

But it was Bourdain’s charismatic presence across television, debuting on Food Network’s A Cook’s Tour (2002), that truly garnered the New York-born chef a following.

Shortly thereafter, Bourdain moved to Travel Channel where he launched the two-time Emmy Award-winning culinary and cultural travelogue Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005), and The Layover (2011). In 2013, he moved to CNN, hosting Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown, which won five Emmys and a 2013 Peabody Award.

The 11th season of Parts Unknown premiered last month on the Turner Broadcasting-owned network.

Bourdain’s death comes just days after fashion designer Kate Spade was found dead in an apparent suicide at her New York apartment.

The National the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) in the U.S. can provide those suffering with judgement-free crisis support. You can also text HOME to the Crisis Text Line at 741741.

About The Author
Selina Chignall joins the realscreen team as a staff writer. Prior to working with rs, she covered lobbying activity at Hill Times Publishing. She also spent a year covering the Hill as a journalist with iPolitics. Her beat focused on youth, education, democratic reform, innovation and infrastructure. She holds a Master of Arts in Journalism from Western University and a Honours Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto.

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