Unscripted

Channel 4 orders Tuesday’s Child’s cannabis docuseries “The Drugs Cafe”

UK pubcaster Channel 4 has commissioned London-based indie Tuesday’s Child to produce a two-part special that will bring the controversial topic of Britain’s drug policies to the masses. Set in a Dutch ...
August 20, 2018

UK pubcaster Channel 4 has commissioned London-based indie Tuesday’s Child to produce a two-part special that will bring the controversial topic of Britain’s drug policies to the masses.

Set in a Dutch coffee shop, The Drugs Café will invite a healthy cross section of adults in British society to indulge in marijuana as an attempt to test the theory that cannabis can bring about more harmonious human relationships.

Each visitor to the café will have a “clear and heartfelt” motivation for getting high, sometimes for the first time. The shop’s guests range from parents aiming to connect more intimately with their child in a 24-hour span than they had in 24 years, to a group of grandmothers wanting to tick the adventure off their bucket list.

The series will capture each guest’s experiences and interactions via fixed rig cameras.

The 2 x 60-minute docuseries is executive produced by Tuesday’s Child’s Steph Harris. The Drugs Café was commissioned by Channel 4′s Dominic Bird, head of formats, and Lee McMurray, formats commissioning editor.

“This Channel 4 series aims to explore the taboos around cannabis at just the moment when societies around the globe are questioning their attitudes towards the drug,” said McMurray in a statement. “Shot through with wit, warmth and humor, it will also be a fascinating study of human relationships.”

“We’re bringing the hotly debated topic of UK drug policy into the mainstream and opening the conversation in homes across Britain with this frank, informative and legitimate new relationship format which is sure to be very revealing, entertaining and wholly unpredictable,” Harris added.

About The Author
Senior staff writer Frederick Blichert comes to realscreen with a background as a journalist and freelance film critic. He has previously written for VICE, Paste Magazine, Senses of Cinema, Xtra, Canadian Cinematographer and elsewhere. He holds a Master of Arts in film studies from Carleton University and a Master of Journalism from the University of British Columbia.

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