Docs

“After the Screaming Stops” among docs at BFI London Film Fest

David Soutar’s After the Screaming Stops (pictured), charting the stormy reunion of pop stars Matt and Luke Goss, collectively known as Bros, will have its world premiere at the 62nd BFI London Film ...
August 30, 2018

David Soutar’s After the Screaming Stops (pictured), charting the stormy reunion of pop stars Matt and Luke Goss, collectively known as Bros, will have its world premiere at the 62nd BFI London Film Festival.

The BFI program includes 225 feature films, 46 of which are documentaries.

Ten feature documentaries will be in competition for the Grierson Award, which recognizes documentary films with integrity, originality and social or cultural significance.

Films screening in this year’s competition include Brisbee ’17, which sees director Robert Greene blending fiction and reality to recount the story of 1,200 immigrant miners deported from a town on the Arizona-Mexico border 100 years ago; Marouan Omara and Johanna Domke’s Dream Away, which follows the lives of a group of hotel workers in the city of Sharm El Sheikh three years after the 2011 Egyptian revolution; and Orlando von Einsiedel’s Evelyn, in which the director turns the camera on his own family and follows as three siblings confront a difficult past and work towards mending fractured relationships.

Also premiering are John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection, directed by Julien Farau and narrated by Mathieu Amalric, recounts one of the high points of tennis star John McEnroe’s career: the final of the 1984 French Open against Ivan Lendl; Marcus Lindeen’s The Raft, which chronicles the story of “one of the strangest group experiments of all time,” using archival footage and interviews with participants of the controversial Sex Raft experiment of 1973, studying human aggression and sexuality.

Rounding out the films screening in competition are Vitaly Mansky’s Putin’s Witnesses, which chronicles the rise of Russian President Vladimir Putin, using  first-hand footage of Boris Yeltsin, Mikhail Gorbachev and Putin himself; The Plan that Came from the Bottom Up from director Steve Sprung, which documents the story of the Lucas Plan, an enterprising UK initiative started by factory workers to avoid massive job losses; Lola Arias’ Theatre of War, which marks the 35th anniversary of the Falklands War with personal stories of British and Argentinean veterans; Robert Minervini’s timely What You Gonna Do When the World’s on Fire?, following a Louisiana community in 2017 after a fatal police shooting; and Matthieu Bareyre’s Young and Alive, about a young community dealing with the aftermath of the 2015 terror attacks and looking for a way forward.

Additionally, Michael Moore’s Fahrenheit 11/9, premiering at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, will screen as a special presentation alongside Viktor Kossakovsky’s Aquearela, which takes audiences on a journey through the transformative beauty and raw power of water.

The BFI London Film Festival runs from Oct. 10 to 21.

About The Author
Selina Chignall joins the realscreen team as a staff writer. Prior to working with rs, she covered lobbying activity at Hill Times Publishing. She also spent a year covering the Hill as a journalist with iPolitics. Her beat focused on youth, education, democratic reform, innovation and infrastructure. She holds a Master of Arts in Journalism from Western University and a Honours Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto.

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