Docs

IDA awards $850,000 to journalistic docs

The International Documentary Association has announced the winners of its Enterprise Production Fund as part of the Getting Real ’18 documentary media conference. The IDA fund supports feature-length projects that explore original ...
September 17, 2018

The International Documentary Association has announced the winners of its Enterprise Production Fund as part of the Getting Real ’18 documentary media conference.

The IDA fund supports feature-length projects that explore original stories while integrating journalistic practice into the filmmaking process.

It receives major support from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Jonathan Logan Family Foundation.

The fund, launched in 2017, awards a total of US$850,000 in monetary aid, along with additional resources and expertise through IDA and its partners: Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, the UCLA Documentary Film Legal Clinic and Freelance Investigative Reporters and Editors.

Twelve projects have been selected, with two remaining anonymous.

Grace Lee and Marjan Safinia’s And She Could Be Next follows women of color running for political office in the U.S. The film, itself made by women of color, explores whether democracy can be preserved or strengthened by those most marginalized in society.

Policing doc Ernie & Joe, from director Jenifer McShane, follows two San Antonio PD officers diverting people from jail into mental health treatment.

Rachel Lears’ Knock Down the House (pictured) profiles women with no previous political experience challenging congressional incumbents to change the political landscape in the U.S.

In Mama Bears, Daresha Kyi follows the conservative, Christian mothers of LGBTQ children working together to support and affirm their children’s identities.

Philly District Attorney, from directors Ted Passon and Yoni Brook, follows civil rights activists looking to end mass incarceration at the source — the DA’s office.

In Skin of Glass, Denise Zmekhol profiles the daughter of the architect behind São Paulo’s largest vertical favela to explore inequality, city planning, and the family legacy.

Loira Limbal documents the increasingly standard 24-hour workday and its impacts on child care in Through the Night.

Tom Shepard follows LGBTQ refugees from Africa and the Middle East seeking asylum in the U.S. in Unsettled.

Untitled Safe Schools Project is Todd Chandler’s look at America’s struggles with keeping schools safe and free of violence in the 21st century.

Women in Blue, directed by Deirdre Fishel, follows three women police officers in Minneapolis following a high-profile police shooting and the ouster of the department’s reform-minded, first female chief, as they work to regain the community’s trust.

“The films are capturing breaking news on the ground; exploring unique and underreported angles of pressing issues; and demonstrate extraordinary vision and commitment to journalistic excellence,” said Carrie Lozano, director of the IDA Enterprise Fund.

“We are committed to supporting a range of stories and storytellers and are delighted that this diverse cohort includes so many women, people of color, and LGBTQ directors and producers whose work will substantially contribute to the public discourse.”

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