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Smithsonian Channel sets WWII forensic special “Adolf Island” for June

Smithsonian Channel, a joint venture between Showtime and the Smithsonian Institution, is to investigate what may be the largest murder scene on British soil in its latest one-off special. Adolf Island ...
May 16, 2019

Smithsonian Channel, a joint venture between Showtime and the Smithsonian Institution, is to investigate what may be the largest murder scene on British soil in its latest one-off special.

Adolf Island will chronicle forensic archaeologist Caroline Sturdy Colls, who led the forensic team that discovered the gas chambers at Treblinka in 2013, as she attempts to uncover a Nazi concentration and labor camp constructed in secrecy on the British Channel island of Alderney during World War II.

The film will follow Sturdy Colls as she examines remnants of the site and ventures to the official Nazi SS archives in Germany to determine whether Alderney served as the scene of Nazi mass murders and where the mass graves are buried.

Sturdy Colls and her team of forensic archaeologists will utilize state-of-the-art technology in their search for missing victims of Nazi atrocities as local authorities attempt to prevent examination of the area.

Adolf Island is executive produced by David Edgar of Snap TV Limited for Smithsonian Networks. John Cavanagh and David Royle serve as executive producers for Smithsonian Channel.

Adolf Island premieres on Smithsonian Channel in the UK on June 18 at 9 p.m. and June 23 at 10 p.m. ET/PT in the U.S.

“The story of what happened to the thousands of forced and slave laborers who were sent to Alderney during World War II needs to be told,” said Sturdy Colls in a statement. “For decades, many have tried to downplay the crimes committed by the SS and other Nazi groups on the island. Forensic investigation offers the possibility to uncover the truth about the fate of these victims, to tell their stories and finally offer a voice to those who suffered and died on Alderney so many years ago.”

“Shining a spotlight on forgotten or misinterpreted history is the essence of what we try to do at Smithsonian Channel,” added Royle, chief programming officer at Smithsonian Channel. “Unearthing the truth is even more important when it involves the horrendous treatment of thousands of people and a long-standing conspiracy of silence.”

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